Can my Maple survive

Discussion in 'Maples' started by pozzee, Sep 15, 2020.

  1. pozzee

    pozzee Member

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    I have a Maple tree which broke about four feet up with the heavy snow in Vancouver about 4/5 years ago. It appeared it had an internal hollow spot weakness. So we cut the tree down to the stump. Then the next year new shoots started to grow. I read somewhere that a new tree wouldn’t grow, well it would grow but would need to be trimmed back to nothing each year because it would not be strong. Well as you can see I let one shoot grow and kept trimming back all other shoots. As you can see the new tree has been growing strong for several years now, but it does seem the spot it has grown from is possibly perilous??? I worry if this winter has a lot of snow and or wind it would break. How can I keep this Maple safe? I thought maybe I should trim back part of the stump, so that maybe the new tree will grow around the stump??? Or maybe??????? Really need advice, such a strong determined tree.
     

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  2. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @pozzee Good morning, if that is the Acer in the centre of photo 3 then you are right it has done very well.
    I'm afraid trees often get damaged during Winter with snow fall, but it is a tree and can cope.
    Unless you want to reduce it for aesthetic reasons and tbh I cannot see why, I would leave it alone. Obviously cut out any dead diseased or dying branches, but IMO that is all.
    You have a strong trunk there and the wound is doing fine. I would use a sharp knife and remove the loose bark around the wound though.
    I know you are probably trying to disguise the wound, but IMO I would remove the planting around the base of the tree. Maples do not like competition. The trunk should also be free of anything. For example soil and mulch etc. The very top root should be showing slightly. This is called the root flare. If that is seen then you know the trunk will not suffer from rotting and decay..

    So IMO, let it do it's own thing.
     
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  3. pozzee

    pozzee Member

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    Thank you so much. And the photos are indeed all the same tree. I will definitely move those plants, they have been there since the tree was planted, I didn’t know that they should not have been. And I will remove that loose bark.

    Do you think I should let another shoot grow on the other side of the trunk, so they will grow together???!
     
  4. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @pozzee tbh I would leave it as one trunk if it were me. Regarding plants around the base of a maple. The drip zone is the usual rule of thumb.
     
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  5. pozzee

    pozzee Member

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    Thank you
     
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  6. AlainK

    AlainK Generous Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    It depends where you cut it : if there are still dormant buds below the cut, it will grow new shoot like the small one we can see in the second photo. But apart from Acer campestre, all the root cuttings I've tried have always failed, most ùmaple species don't grow buds below the collar (the part the where the stem joins the root.

    You cut the tree at the junction of two branches that became trunks, but the line around that region contains dormant buds.

    This being said, we can see that the bark has rotten away down the cut. I would remove the remaining rotting bark and apply - ta-tat-ta!!!)... Bordeaux mix of course. or any fungicide to prevent fungal diseases entering via the wound, especially if that part was cut off because it was sick or damaged.

    Er... I've just realized I wrote about the same as Derek.

    What species of maple is it ?...
     
  7. pozzee

    pozzee Member

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    Autumn Blaze Maple
    How much (other than of course the pealing bark Derek mentioned), should I remove?
     

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  8. AlainK

    AlainK Generous Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    In France, it's sold as "Acer x freemanii Jeffersred", but not very frequent in parks and gardens.

    First, like Derek suggested, I would get rid of the plants at the base of the trunk.

    Then, I wuld remove the bark along the red line, and even refresh the cut almost to this red line. It will take years to heal completely, but even longer if you live a stub. This stub can also be a door to pathogens when it rots.

    The blue dotted line shows where there are many dormant (or not so dormant) buds. Leaving one or two can be beneficial for the wound to heal faster, like 1 or 2. These could be "sacrifice branches" that you can cut out after 2 or 3 years. They help the flow of sap around the scar. Small cuts will heal much faster, especially when done during the growing season, say around June. Another bonsai trick.

    Autumn.jpeg
     
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  9. pozzee

    pozzee Member

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    Did you attach an amended photo of my photo??
     
  10. AlainK

    AlainK Generous Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    EDIT : added the pic in the previous message ^^
     
  11. pozzee

    pozzee Member

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    Ahh now it has come up
    Thank you both so much
     
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  12. AlainK

    AlainK Generous Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    Special offer : Two for the price of one !

    Autumn2.jpg
     
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  13. pozzee

    pozzee Member

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    Would Subdue Maxx Superior Fungicide work on the exposed stump?

    or could/should I make a lime wash and apply?
     
  14. Houzi

    Houzi Active Member

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    Could be worth doing as Alain suggested....removing the stump down to the red line as I doubt any of that is attached to the new trunk.Might also be worth staking if you find the tree is only is only connected by a little meat at the bottom.You''d have a better idea how strong the joint is if you remove the excess stump bit by bit until you get to where old meets new.However I presume the tree has put up with strong winds etc. so far so is stronger than it looks.
     
  15. pozzee

    pozzee Member

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    Thank you
    I totally look at it sometimes and wonder how he is hanging in there lol.
    Such determination
    I will get on your recommendations asap.
    What do you think about using Subdue Maxx Superior Fungicide?
     
  16. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    In the US where it originated AUTUMN BLAZE is a registered trademark used to sell the 'Jeffersred' cultivar. A plant which is inclined to produce multiple heavy erect main stems which are highly subject to splitting later in the life of the specimen if preventative pruning is not undertaken during its formative years.
     
  17. Houzi

    Houzi Active Member

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    Sorry never heard of that stuff here but a quick google had someone suggesting it's the industy standard for stem rot...sounds good.Ron's saying that tree's always had it's weaknesses so be prepared.
     
  18. pozzee

    pozzee Member

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    Well I hope this trunk is stronger. When the original trunk broke it looked like it possibly had “heart rot”, but until it broke it looked very healthy. okay I will let you know how the winter goes.
     
  19. pozzee

    pozzee Member

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    The more we trimmed back the more there was to trim. But the new trunk still seems very solid.
    Besides the fungicide should we fill in the hole left with a paste and wood chip mixture to help the new trunk grow around ?
    I see old methods of cement and foam are not recommended for the obvious moisture that would trap.
    We have also staked the tree just to limited any extreme swaying.
     

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  20. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @pozzee good morning, don't try and fill it IMO. But a paste for the wound might be a good idea. Alain has already mentioned what he uses to treat wounds. I always leave it to nature, but in this case as it is a large area it might help.
     

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