Can a Ukigumo be so green?

Discussion in 'Maples' started by copperbeech, Sep 10, 2019.

  1. copperbeech

    copperbeech Active Member

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    I saw this specimen today; 5 feet, healthy and nicely shaped. BUT I was not expecting to ever see such solid green for a U. (At this nursery it is in lots of shade).

    So could it be a Ukigumo or is it likely mislabelled?

    And say for argument sake it is a Ukigumo. What is the chances that it will remain as is ie all green "forever"?
     

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    Last edited: Sep 10, 2019
  2. 0soyoung

    0soyoung Member

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    Mislabeled, IMHO.
     
  3. Acerholic

    Acerholic Member Maple Society

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    Definitely mislabled. Looks more like Going Green .
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Pots are way too small and should not be buried in the ground.
     
  5. copperbeech

    copperbeech Active Member

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    Pots are way too small and should not be buried in the ground.

    A very healthy looking specimen even so. He buries them as he has success overwintering his stock this way.
     
  6. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

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    I don't know much of Japanese maples, but in general, if plants with a specific leaf color are growing in the constant shade, then they may not show their proper color.
    It looks like the soil is sandy there and such burying won't hurt container plants, because no adverse effect on drainage. Possibly this kind of burying helps to avoid from lying plants down by the wind and also keep roots in more steady temperature range.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2019
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    In the correctly sized pots they wouldn't be so likely to blow over - as it is now their roots will be extremely deformed and compacted by those now proportionately tiny pots, regardless of what the tops look like. Something that will result in failures later, once the trees start girdling themselves.
     
  8. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

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    I agree - I'd like to see a plant that big in a container with at least twice the diameter and height that I see from the photo here.
     
  9. copperbeech

    copperbeech Active Member

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    Given that you haven't been to this nursery I can tell you that it would be difficult to upend this maple as the nursery itself is nestled in a mixed tree woodlot; the JMs interspersed with full grown conifers. And most of the pots have been dug into the sandy soil providing further support.

    It is rare that I don't find a potted tree/shrub/plant root bound regardless of the source. One simply takes a small slice off the bottom and tease out the major roots from the sides and into the hole it goes. I can't recall the last time I lost a plant or tree that exhibited any sign of "strangulation" when dug out.

    Considering the original inquiry of this thread "you" are being too critical.
     
  10. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Friends had to cut down a mature Acer davidii because uncorrected circling roots dating back to the planting date decades beforehand were cutting into the trunk at the base of the tree, causing the bark above the level of the roots to turn black and start oozing.

    Another thing that rootbound trees do is blow over suddenly, once the top has gotten big and heavy enough to overwhelm their defective anchorage. Such specimens can be big enough to do damage when this happens.

    I had a row of foundation shrubs blow over under the weight of snow one winter, about 25 years after planting. Their roots turned out to consist primarily of tight, turnip-like wads dating back to when they spent too much time in small pots during the production process.

    With a few roots that had managed to escape and grow outward here and there accounting for all subsequent top development.
     

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