Blighted Plant Soil

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by PlantScienceOhio, Aug 1, 2015.

  1. PlantScienceOhio

    PlantScienceOhio Member

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    Eastlake, Ohio USA
    Just had to pull two tomato plants because of blight. Is the soil they grew in safe to use for further gardening?
     
  2. PlantScienceOhio

    PlantScienceOhio Member

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    Eastlake, Ohio USA
    One suggestion I have read, is to water the infected area, turn the soil over until completely wet, then cover in plastic and let the sun do the rest. "Cooking the soil", thereby killing bacteria.
     
  3. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Soil management depends on which type of tomato blight you have. Early blight spores survive in the soil and can be splashed on susceptible plants in the Solanaceae family (mainly tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant, and Capsicum peppers). The recommendation in this case is to avoid planting these crops in the affected soil for at least 3 years.

    Late blight spores are transmitted from plant to plant; so the affected soil can be used for anything. However, crop rotation as above would still be beneficial.
     
  4. mort

    mort Active Member

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    Victoria BC Canada
    After losing several batches of tomatoes to blight in previous years, I have changed how I grow them. I water the base of the plants with micro drip or the soaker hose, never with an overhead sprinkler or spraying the plant. I only plant tomatoes inside a green house or under the cover of the eaves of the house. Any plants out in the open garden are covered with a clear plastic tent or roof as soon as the weather turns rainy or damp and the nights become cool. This seems to have fixed the problem for me.
     

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