1. Barbara Campbell

    Barbara Campbell Member

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    I'm interested in obtaining a blackthorn bush (prunus spinosa). Do you know of any nurseries on Vancouver Island which carry this plant? Thanks.
     
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Curious, but why?

    Over here where it is native, people occasionally plant it for its value to wildlife, but it is generally considered a bit of a weed and rarely deliberately planted.

    I couldn't find anything as to whether it is classed as an invasive weed in Canada, but given how it grows here, I wouldn't be at all surprised if it was a potential problem species in your similar climate.
     
  3. Barbara Campbell

    Barbara Campbell Member

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    Well, a friend of mine is eager to make sloe gin! If it is highly invasive I wouldn't want to encourage it here on the west coast of Vancouver Island, but I'm unaware of it being a problem elsewhere in B.C. I would be interested in learning more about this as my spouse is on a mission to remove invasive plants (knotweed, ivy, broom, dune grass) from Pacific Rim Park and the last thing I would want to do is to add another pest.
     
  4. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    It hasn't been a problem in the past, though it does seem to occasionally naturalize; E-Flora BC: Prunus spinosa.

    We're looking to grow one here at the Garden, as well.
     
  5. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I can easily collect some located wild origin sloe stones if either of you want to try growing some (still plenty of sloes on the bushes). You'd have to sort out any Canadian import permissions, though.
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Can't see this being something that would be let in, due to the orchard industry.
     
  7. Barbara Campbell

    Barbara Campbell Member

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    Thanks for the offer, Michael. I'll check with the post office, but I too doubt that they would be allowed in. I'm still looking for a local source.
     
  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Scarce in this region, I have never seen it here. Did not realize how extreme its appearance was - rather like that of a fire thorn - until I saw it in Britain.
     
  9. kevind76

    kevind76 Active Member

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    Don't check the post office - go right to CFIA to find out the rules. You will probably need a Phyto import certificate. If this species is on CITES, you'll need that permit too.

    Hope you can find a local source.
     
  10. Barbara Campbell

    Barbara Campbell Member

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    Thanks for the info.
     
  11. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    It isn't - the species is abundant in Europe, not endangered at all.
     
  12. woodschmoe

    woodschmoe Active Member 10 Years

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    Regarding import requirements, generally speaking seed/stones aren't an issue: biggest concerns surround living plant material. I know Chilterns sells sloe seed, and routinely ships to Canada.

    To be certain, go to the CFIA site as mentioned, but head directly to the AIRS (Automated Import Reference System) where you can search by latin name to determine import procedures. I think however, as above, that sending seed is fine: almost certain no phyto or import permit would be required (I purchase seed from all over the world, almost never need special permits...try bringing in a sloe seedling or scion, though, and it's a whole other ballgame, especially for pyrus and prunus....)
     
  13. kevind76

    kevind76 Active Member

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    Good to know. I just wanted to let Barbara know that it's not just a simple matter of going to the post office.

    Whether or not a species is 'endangered', nor the abundance of a species in it's native location does not seem to have any bearing on CITES. Every country interprets the rules differently, so it is best to check if your country will import a species and if the country you are getting it from will export.

    Anyway, good luck finding your plant, Barbara.
     
  14. Barbara Campbell

    Barbara Campbell Member

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    Success, I think. A friend from Victoria provided me with a potted 5 ft tall, cherry-like, spiny shrub which he believes is blackthorn. He has no idea where it came from or how long it has been sitting in his James Bay backyard. We will see next fall if it produces sloe berries.
     
  15. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    We also had some wild-collected seed in the pipeline -- didn't know that some was already on the way before I piped up here. Thanks for the offer, anyway, Michael.
     
  16. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    That "cherry-like" potted shrub may turn out to be cherry plum instead of blackthorn. Blackthorn does not look much like other Prunus seen here at all. And I've never seen it here, whereas cherry plum is very common in this region.

    Orchard plum suckers may also be quite spiny. Thickets of these are not rare here, as so many orchard plums are planted, and suckering may be profuse.
     
  17. Barbara Campbell

    Barbara Campbell Member

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    I will attempt to send a photo of the possible blackthorn leaves and spines.
     

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  18. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Looks more like Cherry Plum P. cerasifera.
     
  19. Barbara Campbell

    Barbara Campbell Member

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    Oh dear. At least it has attractive flowers. I'm still hoping to find a plant rather than starting from seed.
     
  20. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    As expected, one of the common, suckerous types of plum and not a blackthorn.
     
  21. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Here's a genuine Blackthorn; photo 15/12/2011 - note fruit held long into the winter. The sloes are 12-14 mm long.
     

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  22. Barbara Campbell

    Barbara Campbell Member

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    Thanks, Michael, will keep searching here on Vancouver Island.
     
  23. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Like I said, virtually nonexistent in this region - you, too, may have to bring it in yourself to get it.
     
  24. keithtex

    keithtex Member

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    hi,
    They are quite prolific here in Niagara region, i have grown from seed but they can also be propagated from softwood cuttings I believe. I would be happy to send you some seeds.
    Keith
     
  25. Gobrown44

    Gobrown44 New Member

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    Hi Keith, I live near Port Perry (north of Oshawa) I'm interested in growing Blackthorn bushes (my parents were from Northern Ireland). Would Blackthorn survive in this area? How hardy are they?
     

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