Blackcurrant transplant

Discussion in 'Fruit and Vegetable Gardening' started by pippi shortstockings, Jul 9, 2021.

  1. pippi shortstockings

    pippi shortstockings New Member

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    Hello! I need advice in transplanting my blackcurrant bush to a colder environment. I am currently growing the bush in a container in the Vancouver area, but would like to transplant it into a garden in Northern BC (plant hardiness zone 3a).
    My question is two-fold:
    1- what time of year should I do the transplant, late summer, Autumn or spring? (And if I should wait until spring, should I keep it in a shed over the winter without pruning?)
    2- should I prune the bush down to a few inches after transplanting it?
    Thank you very much for any advice!
     
  2. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Contributor

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    Do currants grow well up in your other town ?

    Is someone there on your property up north to water it now and in to the autumn ?

    Has it fruited already in Vancouver
     
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  3. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Contributor

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    I asked a friend w family up in Peace River area Ft St John

    And yes they grow up there

    How OLD is your plant ? (Currant shrubs have a lifespan)

    And it is healthy now?

    I am not sure why you are pruning it. We never did on a farm at coast yrs ago - so maybe someone else can speak to that topic

    Apparently they layer quite easily if you need more shrubs
     
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  4. pippi shortstockings

    pippi shortstockings New Member

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    Thanks for the swift reply! Yes, currants can grow in the area. My bush is only a year old; I only got 3 berries this season. Yes, someone will take care of them. It seems healthy enough.
    My concern is that if I transplant it in late summer or fall, it will not have time to adjust before winter.
     
  5. Sulev

    Sulev Well-Known Member

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    Black currants are easy to transplant. They can be transplanted any season, if only sufficient watering is guaranteed. The best result would be when the transplanting takes place before flowering or after berries are harvested. In the Zone 3 you probably would not like to transplant when the ground is frozen. When transplanting during drought, plenty of water should be provided after transplanting, for at least couple of weeks.
     
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  6. pippi shortstockings

    pippi shortstockings New Member

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    Thanks for your advice! I will try transplanting in late summer, and then maybe prune it in the spring.
     
  7. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Contributor

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    I say go and plant it ASAP
    The poor thing in a container in the city :)

    Take it and give it a chance in the Peace.

    And if the plant decides to expire - then you have experience which i think is a considerable part of gardening and farming.

    So beautiful up there —- some people don’t comprehend that yes there is BC prairie east of the BC Rockies (continental divide) — it took me a while to comprehend

    I like geography so details like those stay in my mind

    I wonder if @Sulev you have similar climate to (for example) Dawson Creek BC (mile 0 of the AlCan highway)

    @Sulev - And do you prune a black currant?

    Can you grow red currant?
     
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  8. Sulev

    Sulev Well-Known Member

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  9. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Since your plant is growing in a container at this time it is going to be planted rather than transplanted. Transplanting refers to digging a plant already growing in the ground and moving it to another position. This typically involves a lot of cutting back of roots making it a different situation in terms of disturbance to the plant than planting out of a container.

    Where a given kind of plant is fully winter hardy fall planting is preferable to spring. With desirability or feasibility of possible planting before then in your particular instance depending on which situation lends itself more to the plant being kept well watered - if it is more likely to be kept on top of still in the pot with you looking after it or planted out in the new place.
     
  10. Durgan

    Durgan Contributor 10 Years

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    I dig the branches that have touched the ground and rooted. In my Zone 5 four transplanted and after a year are large and produce much fruit. I will soon pick for 2021. They make great slurry/juice. I have six plants in the garden. Any time is planting time IMO.
     

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