Best Fertilizer, disease control and insecticide for Japanese maples

Discussion in 'Maples' started by boloxis, Mar 18, 2011.

  1. boloxis

    boloxis Active Member

    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Burnaby, BC, Canada
    Hi,

    This is just my 2nd spring for my Japanese maple collection, through your extensive experience, can you please give me advice on which is the best commercial fertilizer, insecticide and disease prevention product available in Canada or US? Is there a difference which is best for trees in pots and trees in the ground? Something that would work for most cultivar should work, I don't really care if the leaves would not be as colorful I just want them to be healthy because its very heartbreaking to have spring losses again. Is there anything like a vaccine for that damn Verticillium?
     
  2. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,160
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    Dickson, TN
    I swear by a product made by Bayer called 'Bayer Advanced Disease Control for Roses, Flowers and Shrubs'. Available at garden centers and big box stores. This is a systemic product. Works miracles, but sadly, is very toxic to wildlife (especially aquatics). Use only when necessary, but can literally save a tree from death.

    For fertilizer, you do not want to use the liquid formulations, or an "all-in-one" insecticide/fungicide/fertilizer. You want something very low in Nitrogen and slow acting. I use HollyTone, which acidifies and has lots of organic goodies in it. Maples do not need a lot of fertilizer. Apply at 1/2 the recommended rate.

    For insects, I believe in using the least toxic approach possible, and that really depends on the insect you're trying to control. Usually you kill a lot of beneficial bugs when you get liberal with poisons. Biological controls (ladybugs, nematodes, etc.) are preferred, and organic compunds (Neem oil, etc.) are next in line. Make the product as specifically matched to the pest as possible. Also, condiser hand-picking small infestations, or using a garden hose on aphid outbreaks. Chemicals should always be the last line of defense.
     
  3. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    2,345
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Metro Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    No systemics are registered for use in Canada at the retail level, unfortunately, or perhaps not, the Bayer product is not available here. Neem oil is also not registered for use as an insecticide in Canada and therefore cannot be sold or advertised as such.

    There is no vaccine for verticillium wilt to my knowledge, nor is there much problem with insects or fungal diseases around here on Acer palmatum. The need for 'preventative' products is pretty low. If the plant is in the proper conditions for growth it shouldn't have much problem. Fertilizer is generally not recommended unless the plant shows deficiencies, in fact fertilizer can promote excessive soft growth which can be more prone to verticillium wilt infection and/or damage.
     
  4. sasquatch

    sasquatch Active Member

    Messages:
    214
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    PNW, USA
    After seeing what high Nitrogen fertilizers due to Japanese Maples (the nursery industry needs to stop pumping baby Maples with Nitrogen so they will grow 3 ft a year) I have been reluctant to use fertilizer with my Maples. I use small amounts of slow release fertilizer mixed into my planting soils.

    In the past, I have mixed small amounts of Espoma Bio-tone into my soil when I transplant my Maples. It is a weak fertilizer (4-3-3) with added mycorrhizae. I've never seen it burn a plant, or cause a crazy growth spurt.

    Today, I bought a bag of Fox Farm Happy Frog Japanese Maple Feritilizer. It is a 4-8-5 formula with added mycorrhizae and humic acid. FoxFarm claims this fertilizer is specifically formulated for Japanese Maples, so I have high hopes that it will help my trees grow well and keep them healthy. Is any one else using this fertilizer?

    I'm still not convinced that mycorrhizae are effective in the long run with container plants, but I can't prove that they aren't either.
     
  5. CSL

    CSL Active Member

    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Boston USA
    Last season was my first using Fox Farm Happy Frog - I didn't see any unusual growth on any of my JMs so that's a step in the right direction. This spring will tell me more -

    As for mycorrhizae, I use the Mykos every time I plant or move anything and I have never had an issue with a tree (or plant) taking to its new location, so I'll continue to use the product.

    Cheers,
    CSL
     
  6. teeball

    teeball Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Clayton nc, USA
    Fox Farm Happy Frog Japanese Maple Fertilizer is the way to go.
     
  7. Asavvysaver

    Asavvysaver Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southeastern, US
    That is really awesome that your pesticide list is low. That makes for a healthier population probably.
     
  8. iewoals

    iewoals Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Midwest
    Can anyone who has used Happy Frog Fertilizer tell me what it looks like? Anyone happen to have a picture of what it looks like? I ordered some and received it. I'm just wondering if what I got is the real stuff. It almost looks like a bunch of dirt and small pebbles? Yes, the dirt-like stuff crumbles if rubbed between the fingers but there seems to be some pebbles and similar stuff in there.
     
  9. eq72521

    eq72521 Active Member

    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Kennebunk, ME Z5B
    I remember it looking mostly a white powderish stuff, with some other pebbly like stuff mixed in. I have not used it in a few years - seems skunks or chipmunks around can't stay away from it, and dig all around the pot of ground area to eat it I guess.

    I have used Espoma Biotone as well and recommend it.
     
  10. jwsandal

    jwsandal Active Member

    Messages:
    78
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Auburn, AL- USA
    I only have a few springs on you in my experience (2 in fact) but have come to the conclusion that loss of maples is always a part of collecting, especially if you are trying to keep many of them in pots. I have lost as many as 25% of my 1 year summer grafts in the spring following grafting (this year I only lost 4!!!).

    The question of 'best' of any category will get you lots of opinions and here goes mine. I sparingly use 6-10-10 fertlizer Made by Pennington in my pots every spring along with an application of micronutrients like Ironite. In the landscape I will use Ironite plus a general 10-10-10 or 13-13-13 fertilizer sparingly. Around August, when some maples have a second flush, I will apply another application of fertilizer to my seed beds and my rootstock maples to encourge growth. i am a big fan of fertilizer as a grafter as i am convinced I could not propogate many dwarf cultivars without it because of limited growth and short internode distance on many of these cultivars. I know their are other techniques, but fertilizer on young trees helps me at my skill level propogate some of these smaller maples (which I love).

    'Best' insecticide in my limited but honest opinion is liquid Sevin.

    'Best' systemic fungicide in my limited but honest opinion depends on what you are treating or preventing as most fungicides have a fairy limited scope. Auburn University has suggested both Alliette and Subdue to treat most root born diseases and another local nurseryman of maples has suggested Cleary 3336F. Look these up and see what you think.

    Justin
     
  11. hstiene

    hstiene Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    I live in Cincinnati, Ohio and we had record rainfall this spring and established japanese maples (10 years plus) almost overnight took a hit. Very depressing. My only advice is to either plant the ball shallow if an area where water can accumulatedand am not sure if Phyton27 prophylactically would help.
     

Share This Page