Barefoot roses

Discussion in 'Rosa (roses)' started by GreenGarden, Feb 25, 2007.

  1. GreenGarden

    GreenGarden Member

    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Fremont,CA
    Hi

    I was wondering if there is a chance that I can plant a barefoot( or is it bare root) rose in a container. If yes, what type of container size should I opt for ? And what will be the best time for potting it? Also was wondering if u could provide me with information on the same .. in the form of books, information on the internet,etc.

    Thanks again

    GreenGarden.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2007
  2. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,275
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Maryland USA zone 7
  3. GreenGarden

    GreenGarden Member

    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Fremont,CA
    Re: Bareroot roses

    thanks Newt

    thanks for the info.
    well i was not sure abt the term...:-)
    any idea what would be a good choice for a beginner like me..
    i have heard that i may have to use pesticides to avoid diseases to the plant..
    is there a routine time period for pesticide spraying too just like fertilizers..
    or is it that we use it only when it gets sick,,hope it makes sense.

    Also was wondering where can i find the holy basil plant..or do i need to buy seeds for that.If so, what is the procedure for germinating seeds..can i directly pot it.

    Thanks again

    GreenGarden
     
  4. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    865
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Coquitlam, BC
    There isn't an absolute necessity to spray roses. Except for exhibition roses, most of my roses are not sprayed. And if I do spray, it's for prevention of black spot, a fungal disease. I don't use any insecticides except in the greenhouse. The key to avoiding the use of pesticides/fungicide sprays are:

    1. Grow healthy roses - the foundation of which is good soil, and further maintained with adequate and consistent moisture, consistent fertilising and proper pruning practices.
    2. Grow disease resistant roses.
    3. Grow roses that suit your local climate

    The best sources of information for #2 and #3 are your local rose society, and knowledgeable nuseryman in your community.

    For container grown roses, I make sure of the following:
    1. I use a sterile, soil less potting mix (Sunshine #4 is the one I have been using)
    2. Add bonemeal, 3-4 month slow release pelleted fertiliser, alfafa meal, and water absorbent polymer "water crystals"
    3. Adequate drainage ( I use a 1/2 to 1 inch layer of lava rock, covered with landscape fabric, in the bottom of the pot)
    4. Minimum pot size of 5 gallons.
    5. The sunniest and most sheltered position on the property that will allow me to show off the roses.

    I apply a 1/2 diluted water soluble fertiliser with every other waterings (once a week, on the average) from July onwards.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2007
  5. hortfreak

    hortfreak Active Member Maple Society

    Messages:
    130
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada
    GreenGarden, the one thing I have found with roses is that meticulous cleaning up is a good way to prevent black spot. You musn't leave debris on the ground.

    I have found mulching helpful to prevent soil splash when watering or raining. The soil splashing on the rose foliage can spread any soil borne disease. Just remember that if you do mulch, you do not want the mulch touching the canes. This could cause rotting.

    I am very careful about not getting the foliage wet when watering. Typically I use soaker hoses, but once in awhile, roses might need a bit more water. In that case, I use a watering wand which makes it easy to get the water down to the ground without wetting the roses. I also never water in the evening as our nights are cool. Wet foliage overnight, combined with still air, can cause fungal problems.

    I have also found it very helpful to immediately remove any foliage showing signs of black spot. This helps to keep it from spreading. In fact, I have found that, if I am vigilant, it generally will stop it. I can honestly say that I have never had a real problem with black spot, and I have never ever sprayed roses for anything. Aphids get a sharp blast from the hose. Having said this, I have to admit that I do not show roses, so the need for absolute perfection is not necessary.

    Once a year, I place a big handful of epsom salts around each rose. This has proven to me that this practice really does increase the number of flowers as well as the health of the roses.
     
  6. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,275
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Maryland USA zone 7
    I think most of your questions have been answered but I'll add a few thoughts here. You can make your own sprays from these recipes. I especially like milk for powdery mildew.
    http://www.ghorganics.com/page15.html

    I prefer organic potting soil mixed with perlite to aid in drainage. You can even topdress your pots with used coffee grounds from time to time. The recommendation of epsom salt is often used to green up and help with flowering. Sprinkle a handful on top and water it in.

    I like heirloom roses. Many are fragrant, some rebloom and there are some that will do well in pots. This site has loads of helpful info. Click on 'site map' at the bottom of the page and be sure to scroll down past the names for some great articles. There's even one near the bottom of the page for growing roses in pots.
    http://www.rdrop.com/~paul/hulse.html

    Another good heirloom rose site. Put the word container in the search box for recommendations of good container roses.
    http://www.heirloomroses.com/

    How to repot and rejuvinate potted roses.
    http://www.rosemania.com/Rejuvenate_Potted_Roses.htm

    This place is in California and has some heirloom roses.
    http://www.vintagegardens.com/

    This one is in Texas.
    http://antiqueroseemporium.com/

    You can check references or search for nurseries by state, country or plant material here.
    http://davesgarden.com/gwd/

    Newt
     
  7. GreenGarden

    GreenGarden Member

    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Fremont,CA
    Re: Bareroot roses

    Thanks WeekendGardener.

    Your post cleared a lot of doubts that I had.
    I will check out with my local nursery abt the best roses that r suitable for containers.
    And will surely take good care of my roses once I start out.
     
  8. GreenGarden

    GreenGarden Member

    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Fremont,CA
    Re: Bareroot roses

    HI hortfreak

    Thanks for the reply.
    I guess I will have to be very patient with the plants and give a lot of TLC as u have mentioned.
    It surely has made me more confident in moving a step towards planting roses now.
    And will surely hope for the best results.
     
  9. GreenGarden

    GreenGarden Member

    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Fremont,CA
    Re: Bareroot roses

    Hi Newt

    Thanks for the information
    U have provided a lot of insight too as have the rest out here in understanding the different varieties of roses and also how to take care of them

    Also Thanks for the sites links that u provided on the local nurseries and also for putting in the extra effort to look out for nurseries in my area.

    Thanks again for the contribution.
     
  10. hortfreak

    hortfreak Active Member Maple Society

    Messages:
    130
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada
    GreenGarden, the things I have suggested to help prevent disease really take very little time and will reward you with healthier plants. It takes a lot more time to deal with sickly plants. Of course, Weekend Gardener is correct in stating that you should look for disease resistant plants. There are so many cultivars of roses available now that you should be able to find something that satisfies all your requirements---disease resistance, long blooming, height, width, fewer thorns, etc. I have had really good luck with roses in containers. Enjoy.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2007
  11. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    865
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Coquitlam, BC
    Most of the old garden roses (heirloom roses) are pretty tough and disease resistant. A lot of them have been around for over a hundred years - that says a lot about their resilience and disease resistance. There was a time when all the rage was the hybrid tea. Unfortunately, the goal of hybridisation then was a perfect high centered flower, at the expense of the rose plant being disease resistant and a good garden plant. A lot of the problems with disease susceptibility was bred in because of this. Especially with the introduction of yellow in the colour, which brought in susceptibility to black spot.

    However, the big breeders are now choosing plants with disease resistance as one of the top criteria. Some breeders, for example Kordes in Germany, and Canada's Agriculture Department (Explorer roses), have a long history of breeding for cold hardiness and disease resistance.

    So, I find my safe bets amongst those categories - old garden roses, Kordes roses, Explorer roses or a rose introduced in the last five years. A fine OGR for containers is Madame Isaac Pereire - you will likely need to mail order this one.

    Ultimately, how one deals with common rose diseases also boils down to what one's expectations are. I am totally happy with a rose that gives me great blooms and fragrance in the late spring and summer but then go to the dogs with black spot or powdery mildew in late summer or the fall. I know they will bounce back the following year. As long as they have earned their keeps in bloom power, they will keep their place in the garden. Of course, with containers, things are a bit easier. If the rose gets a bit dishevelled with diseases, I put them in a corner out of sight where they can sulk (but not neglected) for the rest of the season. I have plenty of other container plants to take their places. And in my experience, most of them will bounce back for another useful show next summer. But those roses I grow for exhibition will need to be spotless.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2007
  12. Chuck White

    Chuck White Active Member

    Messages:
    333
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Florida,USA
    Weekend Gardeners' comment about 'Heirloom' roses reminded me of the best source for these 'golden oldies'. What rose bush can you think of that has had less care than that which you will find growing in an old cemetery? The older, the better. A judiciously taken cutting from a 100 year old cemetery can be a joy to behold and possibly a reminder of the person from who's grave it came. In the southern U.S., there are bands of 'little ol' ladies' who travel the back roads armed(always) with snips to sample history. Don't have a clue how legal this is, but it is a customary thing.
     
  13. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,275
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Maryland USA zone 7
    Chuck, there is actually a group called 'Texas Rose Rustlers'. That is how The Antique Rose Emporium (one of the links I gave to Green Garden) got it's start. Here's their history which talks about those "little ol' ladies" that aren't always little, old or ladies. LOL
    http://www.antiqueroseemporium.com/history.html

    And in case you are interested in other 'rustlers' there are heirloom bulb rustlers too. They even sell them now.
    http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/0913/p16s01-lihc.html
    http://www.oldhousegardens.com/

    Newt
     
  14. Chuck White

    Chuck White Active Member

    Messages:
    333
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Florida,USA
    Newt : Many thanks for the refs. I particularly appreciated the 'enterprise' of Michael Shoup at the Emporium. Chuck
     

Share This Page