Bamboo damage (snow load)

Discussion in 'Poaceae' started by LPN, Dec 5, 2006.

  1. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Here's a couple of pics that show how damaging snow loads are to bamboo. Some types seem to have held up better than others. Phyllostachys aurea is by far the worst with nearly half of the culms snapped. I was surprized with Phyllostachys bambusoides as a couple of culms snapped under a wet snow load nearly a foot deep.
    Cheers, LPN.

    Phyllostachys aurea and Phyllostachys bambusoides (last 2 pics)
     

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  2. globalist1789

    globalist1789 Active Member

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    Wow! The one on the right must have sounded like a gun shot when it snapped.

    M.
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Possibly your P. bambusoides is actually P. vivax, as it has white nodal bands visible in these photos. Thinner culm walls, more likely to break are also characteristic of the latter species.

    These two are similar. In fact, I recently saw the combination P. bambusoides 'Vivax' being used. Have not checked to see if this was intended as a replacement for P. vivax or in reference to a third kind. But the point remains the same, the first two are so close to one another someone could easily decide the one was a cultivar of the other. Both were introduced from the same area in China.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2006
  4. petauridae

    petauridae Active Member

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    Quite something...especially the last photo! Thanks for sharing.
     
  5. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    I share Ron's comments about p vivax instead of P. bambusoides.

    I agree, the record snow fall has been brutal, not just to bamboos, but to a number of broadleaf evergreens. I saw the sorry sight of city planted Magnolia grandiflora near our work place with branches snapped off completely.

    I laid all the container grown bamboos on their sides. Those in the ground are left to their devices. Past experience tells me not to stack them. Allowed to bend over completely, both my P. nigra and P. vivax "Aureucaulis" remained intact. In spite of what you see in this picture, all the culms sprung back up once the snow was knocked off.

    Garden26Nov06 001 (Medium).jpg
     
  6. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    OK ... Phyllostachys vivax it is then.
    The only other problem I had with snow load was Eucalyptus pulverulenta. These never grow upright and nearly always have a weak point.
    Cheers, LPN.
     

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  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    High altitude gums seem to lean naturally, even in nature. Many others have been kept in pots too long.
     

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