Baby Bok Choi seeds

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by pasoob, Mar 2, 2015.

  1. pasoob

    pasoob Member

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    I'm looking for Baby Bok Choi seeds, the kind that you see in the markets, about 4" long, with white stems in Canada preferably. Looking for op ones versus hybrids.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2015
  2. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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  3. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Check with West Coast Seeds. They carry several varieties. Search using 'choi' or 'choy' to bring up a list. I believe the one you're looking for is this one.
     
  4. pasoob

    pasoob Member

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    Thanks, Junglekeeper, I have seen the ones that West Coast carries and have purchased Ching, Chiang (Shanghai Pac Choi) already from them. shorter
     
  5. pasoob

    pasoob Member

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    Thanks Sundrop, I will check them out
     
  6. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    Re. the edit to your post:
    William Dam's Canton White Stem Bok Choy in the link I gave you already is an open pollinated, white stemmed, baby type variety.
    Unlike some other seed sellers, William Dam always specify if what they sell is a hybrid or op (and I like that).
    Generally I am for op, but very occasionally make exceptions, as I did when buying from them Sui Choi the Blues Hybrid. Delicious! http://www.damseeds.ca/productcart/pc/viewCategories.asp?idCategory=230
     
  7. woodschmoe

    woodschmoe Active Member 10 Years

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  8. pasoob

    pasoob Member

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    Thanks Sundrop Woodschmoe for the info. I went to a garden shop this afternoon and told the manager what I was looking for. She came back with a packet of Baby Pak Choi "Green Fortune" seeds. I questioned her about on the top of the packet it said "F-1" and at the bottom, it said "Not treated or genetically engineered." I've never seen that before and she couldn't give me any help either. I later did a search on the computer and it says "Hybrid", "Certified Organic", and "Untreated". I'm more confused now for sure. What have I bought? I noticed that even William Dam Seeds have "Hybrid, Organic" on some seeds. I did a quick look at the site Woodschmoe suggested, and it has a nice selection to choose from plus it's in Canada. I'm going to look at the site again later. Is there a seed exchange here? Thanks again for the help.
     
  9. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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  10. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Note that certified organic seed may be hybrid or open pollinated.
     
  11. pasoob

    pasoob Member

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    I do watch out for classification on a package of seeds but never have I come across three on one package before. Now I'll have to wait and see how it stands up in taste and performance with other types. Thanks everyone.
     
  12. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    I am curious which company your Baby Pak Choi "Green Fortune" seeds come from. The information should be on the package.

    Hope the following will help to ease your confusion:

    Organic - refers to the method of growing of the parent plant without synthetic fertilizers, without -cides (pesti-, fungi, herbi- etc.), without the use of genetically altered (gmo) seeds.

    Treated vs. non treated - refers to the method of handling seeds. Seeds can be dressed (covered, treated) with pesticides (most often microbicides, fungicides or insecticides) before packaging or before planting. The dressing material may also contain fertilizer, growth promoters, and other substances. Such seeds are called treated. The chemicals used for treatment may be harmful not only to microbes, fungi, etc., especially when digested after handling the seeds. Treated seeds are most often used in conventional commercial growing. Untreated seed is clean of any chemicals.

    Hybrid vs. open pollinated - refers to the method of breeding plants. Open pollinated is a pure variety, while hybrid is a cross between two or more varieties (F1), or other hybrids. Hybrids are most often developed for commercial growing, with an eye on ease of harvesting, long storage and transportation.

    gmo - refers to seeds that are genetically altered (engineered) and have alien genetic material artificially inserted into their DNA.
     
  13. pasoob

    pasoob Member

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    Sundrop, the Green Fortune baby pak choi seeds were from "Renee's Garden". There's no mention of how many seeds are in the packet just "Green Fortune F 1" on the top and on the bottom is "not treated or genetically engineered." I've sowed some this morning in the seed bed. Than the usual instructions of planting. New one on me. Have to wait and see now.
     
  14. emandeli

    emandeli Member

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    I would like to plant some as well. Will keep following to see how it's doing for you.
     
  15. pasoob

    pasoob Member

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    emandeli: I planted both Ching Chiang and Green Fortune pac choi seeds (with bottom heat) on March 5 and by March 7, the seeds were all up. The germination rate is 100% or close to it. The Ching Chiang seeds are op so I'm going to allow one plant to go to seed to try later on in the fall with them.
     
  16. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to disappoint you, but usually there is much more to seed saving than just allowing one plant of a given variety go to seed. Very often you need much more than one plant to grow good quality seeds, you also need to make sure that your variety will not cross-pollinate with other varieties or hybrids of the same species to produce hybrid seeds.
    Growing seeds true to variety could be relatively easy in case of in-breeding, self-pollinating species like, for example, Peppers or Tomatoes (there are exceptions though). Otherwise, it can be quite challenging.

    Bok choy (or pak choi) belongs to Brassica family and as such is, most likely, an out-breeder prone to in-breeding depression. It means that you will have to allow many plants of your variety to cross-pollinate between themselves and you will have to be careful not to allow them to cross-pollinate with another variety or hybrid within the species.

    If you would like to learn more on the topic see http://kootenaygardening.com/growing_heirlooms.htm
     
  17. pasoob

    pasoob Member

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    Hi Sundrop, thanks for the info. I have allowed to keep both kinds of pac choi apart from each other and have more than enough to pollinate among themselves. It'll be more of a experience with them.
     

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