Identification: Auricularia auricula-judae

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by allelopath, Jul 27, 2006.

  1. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    549
    Likes Received:
    190
    Location:
    northern New Mexico, USA
    These are Auricularia auricula-judae, yes?
    These are on a dead & down aspen.
    I've never collected and eaten these before so I want to be absolutely sure. Is there any other species these could be confused with?

    If indeed they are, can anyone give tips about how to harvest them?
    and then, how to prepare them?

    From what I'm reading, they are have a higher water content than most other fungus and so will shrink greatly. I suspect there something like that black fungus you get in chinese restaurants.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jul 27, 2006
  2. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

    Messages:
    719
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Denver
    Yes, you have the right species there. I eat them. I find them pretty tasteless, myself. I would put them in a salad with walnuts and a light dressing.

    I thought the 'black fungus' you get in indian or chinese restaurants was black trumpets (craterellus fallax).
     
  3. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    549
    Likes Received:
    190
    Location:
    northern New Mexico, USA
    >>I find them pretty tasteless
    Then they are probably used for texture.
     
  4. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    549
    Likes Received:
    190
    Location:
    northern New Mexico, USA
    I found these today, in the same habitat as the a.a.j, except growing and a dead and down spruce, instead of aspen. Definitely not a.a.j. though. It feels different, considerably harder, and looks different, too. It doesn't have the rim or the 'veins'. Anybody know what this is?
     

    Attached Files:

  5. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

    Messages:
    719
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Denver
    Looks like one of the brown tremella species to me. possibly T. foliacea? ---how 'hard' are we talking, though? T. foliacea becomes soft and squishy when wet, but dries up after the rain.
     
  6. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    549
    Likes Received:
    190
    Location:
    northern New Mexico, USA
    >>'hard'
    Still rubbery, just not nearly as flexible as a.a.j.
     
  7. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    549
    Likes Received:
    190
    Location:
    northern New Mexico, USA
  8. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    549
    Likes Received:
    190
    Location:
    northern New Mexico, USA
    Here's a log full of a.a.j.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    549
    Likes Received:
    190
    Location:
    northern New Mexico, USA
    Here is photo of the collected fungi. Before drying (bottom) and after drying (top). The wet fungus in the photo weighed 1 lb. The photos are the same scale. Try drying them on wax paper instead of foil (it was all I had).
     

    Attached Files:

Share This Page