attempting to grow hibiscus from cuttings

Discussion in 'Plant Propagation' started by katspajamas, Feb 27, 2006.

  1. katspajamas

    katspajamas Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC


    last November, i made two cuttings ( 8") from a branch that had snapped off from a healthy-looking hibiscus bush that got in the way of condominium renovation work near False Creek.
    until recently, they have been sitting on a window sill (southern exp.) in a container with water and dissolved rooting stimulant. now, with tiny leaves (largest is about the size of a loony) and even tinier buds which i removed, they sit in a shaded area in hopes of stimulating root growth (which, to this point, has not been successful).
    are there betters method i should be considering in trying?
    i hope to have one potted for indoors and one planted in the yard later in the spring. they both should do well since these cuttings came from an outdoor plant that seems to have been there for a number of years. i'm not an experienced gardener but now i love everything to do with gardening just the same. must be my age (49) or maybe in my genes, afterall i'm Japanese-Canadian.
     
  2. S.S

    S.S Member

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Hervey Bay, QLD, Australia
    Hibiscus do best when the cutting is taken while the plant has plenty of new fresh growth. This is usually around spring. Take about 3" to 4" cuttings from just below the new growth. Make top cut just above where leaf joins stem. Cut same spot at bottom of cutting at about 45 degrees and strip lower half. Cut any big leaves back about three quarters of the way, leave any little shoots on stem. Dip stripped section in hormone and place into propagating mix. Make hole in mix with a pen before planting to prevent hormone being wiped off as you skewer the soil with cutting. Place in well lit, humid condition out of direct sunlight until roots have formed. Pot covered in plastic wrap or something simple works. Spray with water a couple of times a day and do not let dry out. For propagating mix either buy some pre-made or use a well drained light mix that will not hold too much water.
     
  3. katspajamas

    katspajamas Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    much appreciated s.s..
    could i try it with my two cuttings?
    although it was in november when i took the branch home, end of it looked fresh so seemed it had broken off recently, and since it came from a bushy and healthy, outdoor plant, i think they're hardy enough and well worth getting another go at making it big.
    s.s., would 1/2 potting soil and 1/2 sand qualify as "well drained light mix"?
     
  4. S.S

    S.S Member

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Hervey Bay, QLD, Australia
    yes, also coco peat mixed equal parts, potting mix, about 1/3 that sand mix and then 1/3 of that perlite (available at garden centres/nurseries) or styrofoam balls (as in the beanbag type). can also add small amount of slow release fertilser but foliar feeding with soluble fertilser once roots have struck should do.
     
  5. growest

    growest Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    684
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Surrey,BC,Canada
    katz--putting your cuttings into a rooting media is important now...few plants root very well in water. Luckily, hibiscus is pretty easy to root, and yours could do well with a little TLC now.

    The best would be to get the "soil" warm while keeping the top of the stem cooler. Top of a fridge or water heater would be good for this, but the stem also needs some bright indirect light to start the photosynthesis thing. Also popping the whole business into a clear plastic bag will help a lot with keeping the moisture in the stem until roots form...do give this a bit of fresh air but try to keep it "foggy" inside most of the time to avoid the drying out bit...

    Rooting hormone could be helpful because your cuttings are quite woody (summer cuttings could root fine without added hormone, but November means they will be quite hard wooded and tougher to get roots on).
     
  6. katspajamas

    katspajamas Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    thanx growest.
    by the way, which would be the better option for the plastic-bagged cuttings;
    fairly bright north-facing window sill
    or
    top of fridge in the kitchen where it's warm but not terriby bright
    katspajamas
     
  7. growest

    growest Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    684
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Surrey,BC,Canada
    Kats--I think you should move your fridge over to the window :-)

    Seriously, I'd go for the north window, just coz the cuttings will try to grow this time of year, and absolutely need to make some fuel to keep going...the roots would pop out better over the fridge but the cuttings would collapse without any sugars from photosynthesis.

    If you ever want to do this on a larger scale, a simple heating cable under the pots placed all under a growlight is perfect...there are clear plastic domes that fit over a 10X20 nursery flat to finish off the setup...works beautifully for most of the easy garden deals like fuchsias and geraniums too.
     
  8. katspajamas

    katspajamas Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    direct sunlight and warmth on the south window sill is a no, no, right?
    but maybe until this rain clears up.
    after then, the north window, it is.
    thanx again growest.
     
  9. chuckrkc

    chuckrkc Active Member

    Messages:
    130
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kansas City, Mo.
    I am also going to start some hibiscus cuttings, (well, I hope they start!).

    If I had a choice, which would be best: an area lit with fluorescent tubes and bottom heat OR a couple of weeks on a friend's misting bench, which supplies constant moisture but no bottom heat?

    I can wait for spring growth, either way. The growing area in both my atrium and my friend's greenhouse is full right now, anyway.

    Will they grow fast once they are started?

    Thanks.
     

Share This Page