'Attaryi' sun tolerance

Discussion in 'Maples' started by prairiestyle, Jul 11, 2008.

  1. prairiestyle

    prairiestyle Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Hello everyone,

    I'm thinking about planting an Acer japonicum 'Attaryi' in a fairly prominent position in my backyard. It would receive direct unfiltered sun for 7-8 hours, from roughly 7:00 am to 2-3:00 pm.

    Is this too much sun? I would like this cultivar to go there, but can swap it for a more sun-tolerant maple if need be.

    Also, if you have an 'Attaryi', what light conditions do you grow it and how does it respond?

    Thanks!
     
  2. alex66

    alex66 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    hi i presume that every maples in zone 5 haven't problem with the sun exp.
    ciao!
     
  3. kaydye

    kaydye Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Prairiestyle,
    I hope you get some good advice on this one. I also have just purchased Attaryi and have it in a pot wanting to find the perfect location. I am thinking I need to find a sunny spot to get the most color in the fall. I am not looking at as much sun as you have, but will be curious to see what someone says. I didn't see anything in Maples for Gardens about sun/shade.
    Kay
     
  4. whis4ey

    whis4ey Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    You can not compare sun in the mid West with sun in Illinois or in Italy or in Northern Ireland by simply counting hours
     
  5. prairiestyle

    prairiestyle Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Kay,
    It is a beautiful cultivar, isn't it? I love how the leaves look as they're unfolding.

    whis4ey,
    OK, I'll be more specific. 7-8 hours of direct sun, with temperatures reaching the upper 90's/lower 100's (35-40 degrees C) in late July and August. Afternoon humidity in those months averaging 80-85%
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2008
  6. whis4ey

    whis4ey Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    hehehe
    No chance
    Even I couldn't live in that heat :)
     
  7. kaspian

    kaspian Active Member 10 Years

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    Me neither -- I moved here to Maine to get away from that kind of thing.

    Prairiestyle, do you have success with other JM varieties in your hot summers? Sometimes it seems to me there's a certain "touch" involved with this kind of thing; some gardeners seem quite sensitive to the needs of plants in their particular growing conditions and can keep the most unlikely things happy and thriving.
     
  8. prairiestyle

    prairiestyle Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Yeah, I've had one for about eight years that I saved from being thrown away by a neighbor (most of the top had died off). I'm pretty sure it's a Bloodgood but have never had that suspicion 100% confirmed. Anyways, it has thrived in my yard -- granted it gets only about 2 hours of direct mid-day sun. I also have about 15 other (younger) cultivars which are all similarly doing well, though they also receive lesser amounts of direct sun (4-5 hours at very most). I'm surely a novice with these guys, especially compared to many of the people here, but at least they all seem happy. :-)

    And I should mention that those temperatures are the extreme highs - it doesn't stay that hot but it can surely get there!
     
  9. kaydye

    kaydye Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Kay,
    It is a beautiful cultivar, isn't it? I love how the leaves look as they're unfolding.

    It really is. I just happened to see it in a nursery and had to have it. I'm curious prairiestyle, where abouts in the wonderfully warm and humid prairie are you located? As far as soil, is it nice and deep or leaning to the dry side? I would think this might make a difference on your siting of Attaryi with that much sun and heat. If the root structure can develop, you can probably get away with it. By the way, about how mature/big a maple is it at this point? I had some trouble figuring out where to plant mine, but I'm sure it will take some sun to make the colors good, don't you think? The only worry I have with where I planted mine is that it will have some root competition, so I'll have to watch my watering for a couple years. Mine was in a gal pot and about 2+ feet high. The pot was full of roots, but not rootbound, so I'm hoping it will take off. It looks like a vigorous grower.
    Kay
     
  10. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
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    Japonicums do better with their leaves wet
    as the moisture in the air from humidity
    or from marine air can act as a topical
    leaf coolant and hot wind protectant for
    the tree. One of the reasons why we
    liked giving these Japonicums and
    Shirasawanums overhead sprinkler
    irrigation prior to nightfall. Too much
    or prolonged wetness on the leaves
    can cause other issues however such as
    Spring and/or Summer leaf spot or rust
    causing organisms to wreak havoc at
    times..

    Grown here with warm to hot conditions
    with low humidity and prevalent saline
    to alkaline soils is it is prudent to give
    these trees some afternoon protection
    both from sun and from hot winds. In
    areas of Oregon or along the Central
    to Northern Coast and inland Coastal
    areas near here, in more acid soils than
    seen where I am, these plants can do
    pretty well in all day full sun but the
    one requirement is that they get some
    nighttime cooling that we do not readily
    get here. It is not so much the heat that
    scorches the leaves it is that with so
    little change in the high temperatures
    for the day and the nighttime low
    temperatures during the Summer
    months we see a lot more wind
    desiccation than other areas do.
    The leaves and roots just do not
    get an opportunity to cool off and
    thus Summer leaves are more
    prone to be injured or are just
    plain unsightly in some areas..

    I'd provide some later afternoon
    shade for your plant but I'd want
    to know more of your soil type
    and the limitations of your soil
    but then again I want to put the
    tree in one spot and leave it there.
    We advise people around here not
    have it out in a landscape all by its
    lonesome without a larger tree
    nearby to help sun and wind protect
    the tree. The best possible landscape
    setting for us is an Eastern exposure
    with unimpeded morning sun until
    midday or early afternoon and then
    have the tree completely protected
    from the hot sun and winds for the
    rest of the Summer day..

    Sometime take a good, hard look at
    Gomero's setting as an example or
    NJACER's planting layout for their
    Maples and then ponder that perhaps
    what they are trying to do and provide
    for their plants may be an ideal situation
    for you to grow your Attaryi in..

    Jim
     
  11. prairiestyle

    prairiestyle Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Kay,
    I live in Omaha, Nebraska. From what I've seen around here the soil is mostly clay- heavy clay. Fortunately, my backyard backs up to a creek which never runs dry and the soil, while clay, really isn't overly dense - it breaks apart readily and is quite easy to dig into and break up, whether dry or wet. It also seems to soak up moisture pretty well. I'd guess (though I have no idea) that this soil type goes down to the water table, which is about 12-15 feet below where I'm wanting to plant the 'Attaryi' - who is still a little guy about 3 feet tall.

    Jim,
    Though I've never pH tested it, I'm assuming my soil is also alkaline. The tree would slightly be standing alone, though the property has rather heavy forestation along the creek and mature trees/vegetation along the perimeter (which usually act as a pretty good windbreak). I was thinking about planting it about 10-15 feet behind our house near the edge of our patio. It would be getting eastern exposure, with the mid-afternoon shade coming from our house. I've seen Gomero's and NJACER's pictures and would love to replicate their beauty in my own yard! But I'll give them another look and see if I can figure out what sun/shade conditions they work with.

    Thank you everyone for your replies!
     

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