apple maggot, coddling moth or??

Discussion in 'Fruit and Nut Trees' started by sluggo, Sep 12, 2007.

  1. sluggo

    sluggo Active Member 10 Years

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    Vancouver, Canada
    I had several apples fall on the ground the past week and closer inspection revealed the tunneling in the photo along with a few of the insects crawling inside.

    It doesn't look like the pictures I've seen of apple maggots or coddling moth. The damage to the fruit looks like codling moth though. What do others think?

    I've never had these little critters before and I'm pretty disappointed. I guess next year will require maggot barriers and/or spray.
     

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  2. leafclimber

    leafclimber Member

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    I am no expert, just a passionate organic home gardener, but this appears to the work of a codling moth larva. They tunnel into the core then eat the seeds I believe, and exit through the bottom of the apple. I don't think that they are nearly as destructive as apple maggot which instead tunnel through the tasty fruit/flesh of the apple. Not sure what the bug is in the first picture.

    This year for the first time I 'bagged' my apples using a product sold by the Seattle Tree Fruit Society. They sell the Maggot Barriers in bags of 300 for $20, $15 if you are a member. As far as I can tell they are nylon footies that women can wear when trying on dress shoes in stores. In the Seattle area you put them on after the June apple drop, but before the start of July for that is when the flies emerge from the ground seeking apples to lay eggs in. Not sure when coddling moth become active. I believe that these were originally used to prevent apple maggot damage, but it soulnds like they are very effective at preventing coddling moth damage as well.

    It is a little tedious to put them on, but for my 2 trees it didn't take more than 2 or 3 hours. Definitely worth it considering that at harvest time you know that you can eat them off the tree without finding a surprise inside.

    If you want to give them a try go to this web site and email one of the officers.
    http://www.geocities.com/wcfsfruit/STFS_Welcome.html
     
  3. sluggo

    sluggo Active Member 10 Years

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    I'll try that next year.
    It looks to me that the entry point is on the side of the apple. All the apples have little holes on the side.
    thanks
     
  4. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
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    If you are allowed to run a couple of chickens in the area of the trees they also help with codling moth. My original success was with ducks but I think chooks would do the same.
    Liz
     

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