Abyssinian Banana

Discussion in 'Outdoor Tropicals' started by Osbo, Oct 26, 2005.

  1. Osbo

    Osbo Member

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    Location:
    Delta, B.C. Canada
    I have planted an Abyssinian Banana (Musa Ensete Maurelii) in my Lower Mainland garden. In one growing season it has grown to 10 feet in height and 12" in diameter. How can I overwinter this? Do I need to dig it up and store it in my garage? If so, do I cut it back completely? And when should I do this? Or can I leave it in the ground and protect it with insulation and plastic? It's a fabulous looking plant and I'd really like to keep it going.
     
  2. neobb

    neobb Member

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    Location:
    vancouver
    Hi Osbo,

    Sorry I can't answer your question, but I was wondering where you bought your abbyssinian banana. I live in the lower mainland too and would like to get one.
    Thank you!!!
    Hope someone gives a good answer to your question.
     
  3. Osbo

    Osbo Member

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    Location:
    Delta, B.C. Canada
    I bought it in the garden department at Home Depot! The one in Surrey close to the Pattullo Bridge. Also got a papyrus there and some interesting taro.
     
  4. Dee M.

    Dee M. Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Western Washington
    I only have the regular hardy banana but I found an interesting website and forum that is dedicated to gardening hardy palms and other sub tropicals in the Northwest. They have information about wrapping the trunk with bubble wrap. It is called "Cloud forest Gardeners", in the Northwest section of the forums.
    http://www.cloudforest.com/northwest/
     
  5. neobb

    neobb Member

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    Location:
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    Hi Osbo,

    That's cool that you bought it at Home depot!

    I was just checking out the website of Hawaiian Botanicals from Richmond. It says that you cannot overwinter this banana outside anywhere in Canada. So I guess you need to bring it in.
     
  6. ZekeStone

    ZekeStone Member

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    Location:
    Chilliwack, B.C.
    Whoops!

    Appears I've flubbed it.

    My abby, was planted outdoors this spring, but became just too big to be dragged back indoors over winter. I've done this for the last two years, but this winter, have left it outside. I've cut it down to about 2 1/2 feet, wrapped it in burlap, covered it with bark mulch, and have contructed two enclosures with poly-urethane plastic, and glass panels. It's make or break. Kept hoping for a pup to show up in summer, but then read somewhere it only puts them out every six years (then the mother dies).

    On a really optomistic note: one website rates it for USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6° C (20° F),and here (Chilliwack, B.C.) we're rated at 8a. Maybe if I run a light bulb into the enclosure, I can keep it to a close 9a. Here's hoping the winter is kind this year.

    (Don't know if the 'cultivar' makes a difference, but mine is a M. ventricossum Maurelii
    Banana_ab.jpg

    Oh by the way, I picked mine up at the VanDousen annual plant sale, but I know Minter Country Gardens in Chilliwack also offers them.

    Cheers!

    Zeke
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    The temperature ranges listed for USDA Zones are indications of where an average based on annual minimum temperatures during a given, comparatively short period of time fell, not the lowest temperature a plant recommended for that Zone might be hardy to. Record lows in a Zone fall below the average minimum temperature range assigned to it. A plant often needs to be hardy to well below the temperature range given for a Zone to persist there.
     

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