Identification: A plant I got from Japan

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by Zev, May 24, 2006.

  1. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    This is a good stumper! It doesn't look like bamboo to me; the stem lacks internodes. Also I've not heard of bamboo having "white sticky sap" that Zev mentioned. The presence of sap made me think of euphorbia.
     
  2. terrestrial_man

    terrestrial_man Active Member 10 Years

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    The stem in the close ups looks like it is not hollow nor segmented. Euphorbia looks like a good lead!
    Need to check
     
  3. Ginger Blue

    Ginger Blue Active Member

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    Harry, note that Zev was the original poster. Woodsprite is describing a plant that he recently received in Hawaii that he feels resembles Zev's plant. Likely they have two different plants.
     
  4. Zev

    Zev Member

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    Well I suppose it depends on what you call hollow. I know that when one of the stems drys up, it turns tan and when cut in two, there is clearly a small hole going through the middle thats a little bigger then the width of the lead in a pencil. I imagin this is where the white sap goes.

    Also, I looked under Japanese Euphorbia and found this picture. http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/89484/

    It looks a lot like my plant exept mine has never shown any sign of flowering or changing color (Exept when part of it dies)
     
  5. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Last edited: Nov 4, 2015
  6. L.plant

    L.plant Active Member

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  7. Woodsprite

    Woodsprite Active Member

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    I guess I didn't take a close enough look at the pics, my bad. Please disregard my speculations based on my lack of critical observation. Great info, thanks.
     
  8. Ginger Blue

    Ginger Blue Active Member

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    Woodsprite, what plant are you referring to? Are you describing Zev's plant or yours?
     
  9. Ginger Blue

    Ginger Blue Active Member

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    Zev, it looks as if your plant has spider mites. You might want to read up on them and their control (google has lots).
     
  10. terrestrial_man

    terrestrial_man Active Member 10 Years

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    We still don't know! Well I have done some googling and have seen the pics of the above euphorbs but ??? but I did run across a site on plants of Japan by a native! So I have emailed him with the link that shows the seedling growing out of that coconut? and asked if he can id it! got my fingers crossed!!
    Here is the link to his site.
    http://homepage3.nifty.com/plantsandjapan/index.html
    I did not look all through it so maybe it is already there??
    Cheers.
    Hope to hear back in a day but will post if not in a couple.
     
  11. Zev

    Zev Member

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    How can you tell? Is it those tiny spider webs by the leaves?
     
  12. terrestrial_man

    terrestrial_man Active Member 10 Years

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    From : yamaguchi <***@mbm.nifty.com>
    Reply-To : "yamaguchi" <***@mbm.nifty.com>
    Sent : Saturday, May 27, 2006 2:06 AM
    To : "jerry" <********@hotmail.com>
    Subject : Re: can you help me identify this plant

    | | | Inbox


    Dear Jerry,

    This plants is not native to Japan. The scientific name of this plant is Cerbera odollam and it is native to India. Please check the link below.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerbera

    Its seed looks like a palm tree and the seedlings are on sale in Japan as a tropical foliage plant.

    Keep smiling ; )
    Masashi

    At last!!!!! Be sure to visit his site and send him greetings!!!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 27, 2006
  13. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I'd agree with this. Many thanks to Masashi!
     
  14. Laurie

    Laurie Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    During my brief unsuccessful research yesterday, I was also taken to Yamaguchi-san's website. That was good thinking to write to him. I wanted to comment on my impression that the specimen looks like it needs iron (Fe) - leaves lightening towards yellow while veins remain green. Can anyone confirm iron chlorosis? I understand that containerized plants need additional iron, so I have a water-soluble iron chelate micronutrient (which is expensive!) that I apply to my outdoor pots once a year. I also have a question about the seed, which is actually not a coconut. It sounds as though the specimen was potted up with the seed, so I am wondering if the seed was only meant to be the specimen's first 'pot', and if it is actually restricting the root development now?
     
  15. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Ditto and to Jerry (terrestrial_man) for contacting him. Looks like growers should be careful with the 'Suicide Tree' though; the wiki page says even smoke from the wood is hazardous!
     
  16. terrestrial_man

    terrestrial_man Active Member 10 Years

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    Don't know 'bout the chlorosis but if you use a fertilizer that includes the micronutrients then I would think that that would be sufficient. Of course if the spider mite observation is correct then the leaves could look like chlorosis so check for sure-got a hand lens?
     
  17. Zev

    Zev Member

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    Oh wow, I think this Cerbera may be it! As for micronutrients, I'll pay whatever I have to to keep this thing alive. Know where I could order some? And also about the spider mites, are they really a problem? Should I get rid of them and also how?

    Also I can't believe I'm not dead yet! I've gotton that sap on my hands a number of times and don't recall washing afterwards a number of times! I still love this plant but I'm going to be extra careful from now on.

    *Edit* Oh this is a very helpful site! http://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/cerbera_odollam.htm
     
  18. Ginger Blue

    Ginger Blue Active Member

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    Yes, the spider mites are a problem. They won't exactly kill your plant, but they'll make its life miserable. Since your plant is already having trouble, it's important to help it as much as possible. There is lots of info about spider mites on the internet, you might want to google about them.

    Congrats on your ID!
     
  19. Zev

    Zev Member

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    I want to thank everyone who helped with IDing my plant! I've been trying too figure it out for two years! I'm going to look into getting some micronutrients and taking care of those darn spider mites (I just wiped my whole plant with a wet napkin).

    Thank you all!
     
  20. Woodsprite

    Woodsprite Active Member

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    Ginger Blue, I think it is a Dracenea Janet?
     

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