Identification: Unknown small magenta flower

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by aavery, Jul 29, 2017.

  1. aavery

    aavery Member

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    A few days ago, I purchased some Sedum mexicanum and it came (apparently deliberately) with a small flowering plant among the Sedum stems. All my attempts to identify this plant have failed, so I would appreciate any help that anyone can provide. I have included a few photos detailing a flower, some leaves, and a flower cluster.

    Flowers:
    - ~12mm across
    - 6 petals
    - Magenta/violet petals
    - Mirror symmetry (but almost regular symmetry)
    - Flower detail:
    > SEDUM-2-20170729-1.jpg

    Leaves:
    - Opposite
    - ~18mm long, ~9mm wide
    - Simple
    - Ovate
    - Smooth margin
    - Pinnate venation
    - Sparse fine hairs
    - Somewhat shiny surface
    - Relatively stiff, but not succulent
    - Medium green
    - Leaf detail:
    > SEDUM-2-20170729-2.jpg

    Stem:
    - Herbaceous
    - Dense fine hairs
    - Flower cluster & stem detail:
    > SEDUM-2-20170729-3.jpg

    I have already entered this information into several flower identification websites, with no results that look anything like this.

    I hope someone can identify this. Thank you in advance.
     
  2. Douglas Justice

    Douglas Justice Active Member UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society 10 Years

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    Cuphea species.
     
  3. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    @Laura Caddy , the Garden's alpine curator, suggests Cuphea hyssopifolia.
     
  4. aavery

    aavery Member

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    Thank you very much, Douglas, Daniel and Laura. C. hyssopifolia seems to be the one. Thanks again.
     

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