Asian Garden: Taiwania cryptomerioides

Discussion in 'Photographs' started by Daniel Mosquin, Oct 21, 2003.

  1. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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  2. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    That interpretive sign talking about the still juvenile leaves though over 20 years old is from at least seven years ago. So 27 years in the ground and still juvenile leaves. This is the specimen that has the interpretive sign.
     

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  3. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Saw one in northern Italy last year with adult foliage, and cones. The adult foliage was only in the upper third or half of the tree, which was around 20m tall.
     
  4. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Yes, I've been looking at the top - the photo I posted was from a top branch. I keep thinking I could be the first to see an adult branch!
     
  5. DaveK

    DaveK Member

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    @Daniel Mosquin

    How big is now the Taiwania ?
     
  6. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    This particular planting (we have several) is about 8m tall, I guess, maybe a bit taller.
     
  7. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Our Taiwania cryptomerioides is grown up now - with adult leaves and pollen cones. This is the first I've noticed the cones, but I don't know how long they've been there.
     

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  8. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Keep an eye out for seed cones too later in the summer, they are very inconspicuous at pollination time.
     
  9. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I can't do this with a 12x zoom. Are these all pollen cones? I thought the one in the red box might maybe be a seed cone? Does anyone at UBC have a camera that's up to this? Or a ladder?
     

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  10. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    'Fraid that's just another pollen cone. Any seed cones will also be high up near the top of the tree (likely in the top 5 or 10% of the live crown).
     
  11. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    This is from the top - that's what I was complaining about with the best I could do with the zoom. Here's the original photo, from which I cropped the one I posted.
     

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  12. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Could be some possibles there, but nothing definitely distinguishable from new shoot growth. Seed cones will be green, and still very small; I doubt they'll be easy to spot until around mid summer (late June / July). Even in September I found it tricky to see them with binoculars on the tree I saw in Italy. Photos here (pdf, on p. 43).
     

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