Self-pollinated seedlings

Discussion in 'Plants: Nomenclature and Taxonomy' started by Barry Roberts, Sep 5, 2013.

  1. Barry Roberts

    Barry Roberts New Member

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    To retain the characteristics of a cultivar it is usual to propagate it vegetatively by cuttings or division, thereby creating clones. But if I isolate a plant that will self-pollinate, will the resulting seedlings be true to the form of the parent and will it be taxonomically correct to use the cultivar name for these seedlings?
     
  2. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I think the answer depends on the taxon being grown, but generally the offspring will not be the same as the parent. Some plants are simply self infertile, so nothing would result from those taxa. Some plants produce apomictic seeds--these will produce direct clones of the parent without actual fertilization. Some of these may also produce pollinated seedlings--so you would have to watch for that. There is also what are called stable seed varieties. This is what you have with annual seed varieties. The breeder has continually selected for particular traits over enough generations to "weed" out the unwanted genes until the strain is deemed to be stable.
     
  3. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Contributor 10 Years

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    I found this explanation:
     

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