Painting pruned ends

Discussion in 'Rosa (roses)' started by Krus, Dec 3, 2009.

  1. Krus

    Krus Member

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    I'm new to BC, and I don't know much about rose care anyway. I understand that pruned ends of canes should be painted after pruning, but I can't find the answers to the following questions:
    a) Should the ends be painted immediately after pruning?
    b) All the ends, or only the larger, older canes?
    c) What should I use to paint them?
    d) Why do they need painting anyway? What will happen if I don't paint them?

    Any discussion would be helpful...

    Krus
     
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Nope - they don't need painting. That's just a myth invented by the paint sellers ;-)
     
  3. valleygardener

    valleygardener Active Member

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    Michael is right! In British Columbia, while cane borers are present in rose gardens, they don't really do damage. In our garden of 800 roses, we have found a few canes where the borer has entered, but it has caused no damage to the cane. So, you can save yourself money and work by ignoring cane borers.
     
  4. Krus

    Krus Member

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    Thanks very much, Michael and ValleyGardener. That's what I suspected. Yes, it does save me time and effort.

    Krus
     
  5. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Never knew anything about having to paint cut ends of rose canes, so I was and still am happily pruning away without that extra time consuming step. That would be impossible with a few of my climbers. Haven't had any damage to canes. But the wisdom of someone who grows 800 roses is worth it's weight in gold on the subject!
     
  6. Kale

    Kale Member

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    Here in Michigan USA we have borers to be mindful of. And damage they do indeed! Depends on the environment.
    I do not use the paint but I do try to faithfully seal the older pruned stems. I have a solid complete eco system and when those bees and wasp and beneficial flies want a home they will bore into my roses if there isn't a place for them to do so. I have (personally and elsewhere (s) I tend) lost several 4-6 foot stems with clusters of blooms more then once during any given season.
    Many roses will recover but sometimes it will take the whole season. It is a chore to keep up with them. I do not use chemical and I try to keep them out. Every year they attack causing much damage at times, even though I have new clean wood everywhere for them to borer in. I also have several others attack your scented roses.Moths of various kinds lay their little ones on my roses I miss it until morning when the buds are chewed or destroyed.
    So yes there is a paint but no I wouldn't use it. I tried true bees wax to seal and every bee in Wayne County was at my house! That sure didn't work *LOL
    I grow over 135 roses on my land and tend Large public gardens elsewhere.
    Personalty I love the Hybrid Teas, Grandifloria, Floribunda, (single and double )Knock-outs and Polyanthus, although I have Minis and English shrub Roses, My Climbers are yet to perform and win me over. Still waiting on several to display with meaning*LOL

    Michael, what kinds of Roses do you grow and do you spray them ?
    Do you have a crew/ staff of tenders?

    Kale:D
     
  7. gatoso

    gatoso Member

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    Never heard of painting the canes...I do not think you need it.

    I only put the canes in pots with good soil in the fall and wait and see.

    I always save the canes of my favourite roses and this year i have 14 new roses, some have changed colour and some I am not still sure what they will be...

    I have asked friends to please save me some canes in the fall, it is free and it is cheap.

    Good luck!
     
  8. roughrosa

    roughrosa Member

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    Location:
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    I do paint the ends but that's because my place receives a lot of rainfall. The nasty fungus can easily infects open wound if left alone. Usually this happens on older canes, where plant growth is minimal.

    The paint that works in my garden is called plant sealant/wound dresser; this is made from rubber hence quite natural, safe and easy to apply to.

    I don't paint all the time, only during rainy season.

    Hope that helps.
     
  9. minirose

    minirose Member

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    The point to this exercise is too seal the cane. I don't believe it matters the substance. Personally, I use wood glue but again the point is to seal off the cane to prevent moisture from coming down inside the cane thereby setting up a breeding ground for bacteria. I guess you could use anything from paint, wood glue all the way to a to a moisture meter. But the point is that the cane has to be sealed once a hard prune has occurred.
     
  10. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    Actually, I think that's a myth that may have been promoted by researchers, depending.

    I recall reading that research was done years ago showing that some pruning cuts closed faster with pruning sealer, and from that it was assumed that pruning sealer use was better.

    But the pruning sealer companies must prefer that people over-use their products unless they don't mind going out of business or losing a product line.
     

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