Need Help Locating Huckleberry Variety

Discussion in 'Pacific Northwest Native Plants' started by ssmfisher, Jun 28, 2011.

  1. ssmfisher

    ssmfisher Member

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    I have been trying to locate (for purchase) a specific Vaccinium ovatum, Evergreen Huckleberry "Pursh". There are other varieties in the plant centres around Vancouver, but I am unable to find "Pursh". I would appreciate any information. I have attached a photo to help, in-case I have gotten the variety wrong. I have concluded the variety name is "Pursh" from cross-referencing photos and information on a few web-sites and blogs. I am looking for the variety in the photo. Thank-you.

    mod-edit: This site contains images of the plant being asked about.
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2011
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years of Activity

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    Pursh is the author of the name Vaccinium ovatum, not a cultivar name. He is the person who scientifically described and published the description of Vaccinium ovatum.
     
  3. ssmfisher

    ssmfisher Member

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    Thank-you for letting me know about "Pursh". Do you, or does anyone else know the name of the variety I am looking for. The plant centres in my area do not know, and the information about plant varieties is very elusive. Any help would be appreciated. Thank-you.
     
  4. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years of Activity

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    Not too sure what you are asking... Vaccinium ovatum or evergreen huckleberry is the species that can be found in the wild and is also sold without a cultivar name in the trade (it is even a Great Plant Pick for the Pacific Northwest).

    There are relatively few cultivated varieties of it available in the trade. 'Thundercloud', which I have no knowledge of, and 'Thunderbird', which is a UBC Botanical Garden introduction:

     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years of Activity

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    Apparently you read a description of the species and thought it was talking about a cultivar 'Pursh' when it was not. So there is no other cultivar name for this non-existent variant you are looking for. Possibly many or any plants acquired simply as the species would fit the bill.

    I bet 'Thundercloud' is a mistake for 'Thunderbird'. I have seen another cultivar offered, think I may have bought and planted it - but don't remember which specimen it is or what it was called, would have to go back and look for labels among several plants.
     
  6. MoDirt

    MoDirt Active Member

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    Grab a picnic basket and some pruners and head to North Vancouver.


    Head into an old growth stand and take a few cuttings. Maybe 2-3 cuttings from 4-5 bushes. Take home and root.

    Lots of good info on rooting from cuttings on-line. Now is a good time to go as you can fill your basket with berries as you search.
     
  7. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years of Activity

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    If in an area where it is permissible to take cuttings, that's an okay idea ... but the timing is better at other times of the year, I suspect:

    Successful vegetative propagation of native species from Vancouver Island University -- doesn't include the Vaccinium above, but does mention when it is best to do other species
     
  8. MoDirt

    MoDirt Active Member

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    Your right about the timing Mr Mosquin but then your face would not be stained with berry juice.

    I find that Vaccinium root easily so I thought a 1 in 15 chance is not bad. Even if all fails you get a nice relaxing day.

    P.s Salmon Berry bushes are ready too
    I like to stuff a Huckleberry in a Salmonberry. I call them SuckleHalmonberry's
     
  9. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years of Activity

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    If ripe fruits are present then new specimens could be raised from seeds. Otherwise small, inexpensive plants are available at outlets.
     
  10. ssmfisher

    ssmfisher Member

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    Thank-you to everyone who has replied. After more searching last night, a phone call to a botanist at the Royal BC Museum this morning, and everyone's lovely replies here, I have concluded that I am in fact looking for the wild species, the Evergreen Huckleberry without a cultivar name. Luckily I have found a nursery, Nats Nursery, that specialises in native plants, and they have forwarded me to plant centres that buy from them. Through this entire process I have started to build a world around me of people with a vast amount of information on botany, and knowledge of places where I can get the plants I want and need. Thank-you.
     

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