Linden Tree Propagation

Discussion in 'Plant Propagation' started by Jebbie, Aug 27, 2008.

  1. Jebbie

    Jebbie Member

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    In my backyard is a linden tree that is approximately 40+ years old. Since we've moved into this house, me and my sisters have become very attached to it (we named him Hubert Winairz Wiebe). The tree itself has a long story behind how it came to be in our backyard. I would elaborate but I'm here for professional help, not to tell stories.
    This November, we'll be moving into a new house. Our neighbours have been wanted to cut the tree down for a long time but we've always convinced them to not. Once we move out, I'm sure they won't hesitate to find a way to take it down. If there was some way that I could take a part of the linden tree and keep it alive, it would mean the world to me and my family. I'm eighteen and I know my way around flower gardens and I have propagated strawberries before, however, I have never attempted to grow a tree never mind propagate one. I'm not sure how much it will help but the tree has small shoots coming out of its trunk and it is a very healthy tree. I live in Manitoba and the weather is starting to get cooler here and fall is on it's way. I hope that is enough information.
    Please, if there is anyway I can save my tree, I would be very grateful.
     
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years of Activity

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    Generally, they are grown from seeds, though it is also possible to layer the basal sprouts - cut a nick in the bark on one of them, add a spot of rooting hormone, tie a clear plastic sheet round the shoot just below the cut, pack some moist compost round the cut, and tie the plastic again above the cut to hold all the compost in place. Make sure the compost never dries out. In a year or two you should see plenty of roots growing into the compost; when this happens, cut the shoot off, remove the plastic, and plant the shoot as a new tree.

    PS . . "(we named him Hubert Winairz Wiebe)" . . . if you were really attached, you'd name yourselves after the tree, not the other way round . . just like Linnaeus ;-)
     
  3. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years of Activity

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    Linden trees are not the easiest to propagate. seeds should be planted as soon after they ripen as possible. Older seeds develop a hard coat, and must be soaked in sulfuric acid, rinsed thoroughly, and then stratified until spring in moist peat moss for satisfactory germination; or they may be stratified for four months at a warm temperature and four additional months at 40 degrees F. If the tree has suckers growing at the base, they can be dug up with roots attached and planted. Your best bet is to have a good-bye party for the tree and then move on. - Millet

    Plow - Plant - Fertilize - Harvest - Repeat
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years of Activity

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    Apart from the difficulty of growing linden seeds seedlings of your tree would not be the same individual. You might as well buy a whole new specimen for the new location as grow seedlings of the one you have now. To continue on with the same genetic individual you will have to graft it or grow it from cuttings. Maybe you can find someone to graft it for you, otherwise you will have to learn how to clone it yourself and undertake this operation successfully before you move.
     

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