Fast Privacy Screen in zone 4A

Discussion in 'Garden Design and Plant Suggestions' started by LBinMN, Nov 13, 2006.

  1. LBinMN

    LBinMN Member

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    What are my options for a privacy screen on a property line (fence exists, but cannot make it taller). I live in a rural area where winters may dip to -25F and summer heat may rise to 100+F. We live on a lake and it can be windy frequently. The location is mostly sunny and would need approx. 50' of screen. Would like something that is visually pleasing and not invasive. Winter privacy is not an issue, since the neighbors go south starting Nov - April. Neighbors in favor of more privacy, too.
    Anybody have any suggestions that won't cost me an arm and a leg?
     
  2. smivies

    smivies Active Member

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    You haven't indicated how tall or wide this screen can get (without being obtrusive), if you desire an informal (ie. hedgerow) or formal (trimmed hedge) screen, or how much work you want (pruning, trimming, etc.)?

    One of my favourite low maintenance informal screens is a row of common lilac. Drough tolerant, low maintenance, tops out at ~15' tall, and fast growing. A shorter screen ( 8') might be a row of Northern Gold Forsythia or Spiraea x vanhouttei (rabbits like this one). Japanese Barberry or Common Barberry are good but somewhat invasive.

    Look at these as well
    - Saskatoon Berry (Amelanchier alnifolia)
    - Siberean Peashrub (Caragana arborescens) - invasive
    - Beauty Bush (Kolkwitzia amabilis)
    - Mockorange (Philadelphus sp.)
    - Ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius)
    - Currant (Ribes aureum)
    - Elderberry (Sambucus sp. except nigra)
    - Buffalo Berry (Shepherdia argentea)
    - Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides)

    Hope the list helps
    Simon
     
  3. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years of Activity

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    Hi LB,

    I agree with Simon, it would be helpful to know the height and width available. An example would be that you can only come out from the fence 10'. I'm guessing that the area is full sun. I get your hardiness zone as 4 so your choices will be a bit limited. Here's a zip code zone finder in case you aren't sure of your zone.
    http://www.gardenweb.com/zones/zip.cgi

    Do let us know the height and width and I'll try and add to Simon's list.

    Newt
     
  4. haul0348

    haul0348 Member

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    Do you know if the siberean peashrubs are evergreen as my question would be the same as LBinMN. I would like to plant a boundary privacy screen that would be year-round. I live in zone 6 and height and width do not matter Thankyou in advance for any info you may have.
     
  5. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years of Activity

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    Haul, they are decidious. Actually all the ones on Simon's list are.
    http://www.hort.uconn.edu/Plants/c/cararb/cararb1.html

    For zone 6 evergreens consider evergreen holly for your screen. They don't grow fast but will stay full and won't need pruning. With most hollies you will need one male and the rest females so you can have berries. Foster holly is an exception and doesn't need a mate and will grow to about 20' to 30'. The others are named and will be easy to select the males and females. Here's some ideas.
    http://www.mobot.org/gardeninghelp/plantfinder/Plant.asp?code=Q190

    These grow to about 10'.
    lex 'Mesog' CHINA GIRL
    http://www.mobot.org/gardeninghelp/plantfinder/Plant.asp?code=D490
    Ilex 'Mesdob' CHINA BOY
    http://www.mobot.org/gardeninghelp/plantfinder/Plant.asp?code=D480

    These grow to about 8' to 10'.
    Ilex x meserveae BLUE PRINCE
    http://www.mobot.org/gardeninghelp/plantfinder/Plant.asp?code=D460
    lex x meserveae BLUE PRINCESS
    http://www.mobot.org/gardeninghelp/plantfinder/Plant.asp?code=D470

    More holly info.
    http://landscaping.about.com/cs/winterlandscaping1/a/holly_trees.htm

    There are several upright Junipers that might work for a living screen. Juniperus chinensis 'Spartan' - Spartan Juniper is one example.
    http://www.fowlersnursery.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=plants.plantDetail&plant_id=588
    http://www.sunnygardens.com/garden_plants/juniperus/juniperus_1566.php

    If you have the space to let Canadian hemlock grow without pruning, that might also be an option. These can also be sheared.
    http://www.hort.uconn.edu/Plants/t/tsucan/tsucan1.html

    There are many Yews (Taxus) that grow fairly quickly and will get quite large. This site should give you some ideas. It often loads slowly.
    http://www.jcbakker.com/pdf/evergreens.pdf

    Consider Arborvitae too. Depending on which cultivar you get they grow about 15' to 30' tall and 10' wide. Think about planting them in a staggered 'W' pattern, if you have the space, so they don't look like soldiers all lined up. Here's an interesting site on Arborvitae. Arborvitae 'Emerald Green' and Arborvitae 'Green Giant' are good selections and grow quickly if cared for properly. The second picture shows them lined up like soldiers.
    http://www.aboutarborvitae.com/
    http://www.waynesboronurseries.com/prodimag/thjocem.jpg
    http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/57953/

    Later on you could plant other shrubs in the indented areas or in front of the evergreens if you have the space. Those could be something like a Virburnum that flowers in the spring and offers berries to the birds in fall and winter. The birds will bring life to your garden during your long winters, and the berries against the green background and with snow on them are pretty to look at. This first pic is a deciduous holly called 'Winterberry' with snow. The second is more info on the shrub.
    http://home.comcast.net/~robertandmichael/winterberry.jpg
    http://www.gardenguides.com/articles/berrybirds.htm

    More ideas:
    http://www.millernursery.com/evergreen.htm

    Here's some info about a living wall.
    http://landscaping.about.com/cs/hedgesfences/a/privacy_fences.htm

    If someone suggests any plant material you can always research it at http://www.google.com/ - best to use the botanical or Latin name if you have it as there are often many plants with the same common name.

    If you decide to mail order any plant material you can check their references here and even search by state and plant material.
    http://davesgarden.com/gwd/


    Compost and mulch calculator:
    http://www.cedar-grove.com/calculator.asp
    http://www.atstecks.com/mulch.htm

    Newt
     
  6. haul0348

    haul0348 Member

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    Thankyou for the great lot of info it will be a tough choice to make.
     
  7. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years of Activity

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    You are so very welcome! I like the hollies as they feed the birds with their berries and add another element to the environment. The birds will also eat and feed insects to their young, so they are most beneficial.

    Newt
     
  8. haul0348

    haul0348 Member

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    Thats the way i am leaning because i also like the holly and they are very easy to manage. Are the shrub holly and tree type actually 2 seperate versions of the same species?
     
  9. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years of Activity

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    It would depend on which holly you choose as to whether it's a shrub or a tree.

    Newt
     
  10. haul0348

    haul0348 Member

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    I have seen a few around the area that are about 10 to 15 ft tall and about 3 or 4 ft in diameter. What type would this be considered as?
     
  11. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years of Activity

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    Probably a tree, especially if they are shaped like a pyramid and evergreen.

    Newt
     
  12. haul0348

    haul0348 Member

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    Yes they are pyramid shaped Thanks for the info.
     
  13. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years of Activity

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    You are so very welcome!

    Newt
     

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