Datura, Brugmansia advice please...

Discussion in 'Outdoor Tropicals' started by parkeey, Jun 24, 2008.

  1. parkeey

    parkeey Active Member

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    i have purchased a large datura, i have planted it outside in full sun, it looks lovely and the scent is even better. However do i have to tie it up to the fence as it moves around quite alot in the wind or will it be ok? Also how hardy is this in uk winters????

    pic inclosed - any other adcie om these be appreciated
     

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  2. karmahappytoes

    karmahappytoes Active Member

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    parkeey, first this is a Brugmansia not a datura, each was given it's own genis name and no longer known as Datura. Both are totally different but same family. Do you have a name for the one that you purchased? I can't get a clear enough look to tell which one it is to classify which species to give you a direction to go. It's in the ground so you will have to dig it up in the fall and bring it in as they are not hardy up north. You can go to our website and learn more, we can be reach directly from the site. As for tying it down to the fence, one can do that but use something that will allow some movement and not harm the trunk.
     
  3. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years of Activity

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    These also root quite easily from cuttings.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  4. karmahappytoes

    karmahappytoes Active Member

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    LPN, that would depend on the species. Some do not root in water some take soil, there are some that are very difficult to root in any method. Would you root a B. Candida Double White the same as B. Frost Pink?? Please read our site or do a google search on these.
     
  5. WesternWilson

    WesternWilson Active Member 10 Years of Activity

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    How lovely you found such nice big Bruggies! I saw one in the UBC Botanical garden shop a few years ago (a Charles Grimaldi) and it has sparked a love affair. I placed the CG outside our kitchen door and at dusk its heady perfume would swirl in on the evening breeze....intoxicating!

    I have just started my first flat of seeds from the ABADS. For a nominal fee, they will send you packets of seed from member hybridizers. You grow them out and let them know what you got! I received one packet of mixed singles, one of a Versicolour Apricot cross, and one of a Pink Beauty cross.

    Last year, I had some new ones purchased from Brugmansias Etc. but alas neglected to get them into the garage in time and lost all my adult plants to our colder than usual winter (I have seen bruggies planted in the gardens locally survive the west coast winters). All I have this year is a single cutting from the Charles Grimaldi that spent the winter in a jar of water on the windowsill, and rooted happily this spring. That plant is about 2' high and I will be sure to bring it in this winter!

    In a small local nursery now long gone, they had a 20' wide and tall Brugmansia tree in their greenhouse. It was lovely.

    As for your plants, I would air layer at the top of the stems and also feed the bejeebers out of these plants so you can also take cuttings late in August. If the air layering works, you will be able to replant without that long, unsightly stem. If the cuttings work (and brugmansias are usually easily rooted from cuttings), you have backup plants to add to your landscaping....or give away!

    Whether you are in Kent, England or Kent, Washington USA, you will want to bring the plants in for the winter. Liz at Brugmansias Etc. suggested putting the plants in 5 gallon pots the sides of which are deliberately slashed or holed. Those 5 gallon pots are sunk in fresh, rich soil either in planters or a garden bed in the spring, and when the season is done, they are lifted, the roots are trimmed back to the 5 gallon pot, and they are stored in a cool, frost free place for the winter. I find I have to water my plants a few times over the winter. I also usually prune lightly before putting them away.
     
  6. parkeey

    parkeey Active Member

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    if i only air layer once the plant would look funny rite with one main stem longer then the other.. is it not best to air layer both stems to end up with just too largish stumps that will hopefully regernate next spring? DO I AIR LAYER JUST ENDER THE YELLOW LEAVE ON THE STEMS?

    Will the ones i air layer need pruning or can i keep all that growth on ?
     
  7. Debby

    Debby Active Member 10 Years of Activity

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    I recently read that brugmansias should be cut back by about one third after the first flush of blossoming is done. I intend to do that, given that one of our two plants has been afflicted by spider mites. Still bloomed mightily. We have our plants on our sundeck as a visual barrier between us and the neighbours. The location makes them easy to water/fertilize and near enough to appreciate/smell in the evening. The other thing I read (wish I could recall where) was that the plants should be reduced by another third before bringing them outdoors again in the spring...
     
  8. WesternWilson

    WesternWilson Active Member 10 Years of Activity

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    A light pruning is all that is necessary if you want to have them continue to keep growing in size. You want to create branchings, which equals flowers, but keep the plant looking large and elegant.

    Parkeeys problem is too long stems that are never going to look nice...airlayering up high to produce a rootball with a nicely proportioned plant above it is the way to go, then keep the stemmy part to take cuttings from, eventually it will probably find its way to the compost heap, once you have attractive, rooted cuttings to take its place.
     
  9. Debby

    Debby Active Member 10 Years of Activity

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    Here is a recent picture of my brugmansia...

    There are (clashing!) petunias in railing planters too.
     

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  10. WesternWilson

    WesternWilson Active Member 10 Years of Activity

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    That plant is lovely, Debby! Do you know the cultivar?

    It must be heavenly at dusk!
     
  11. Debby

    Debby Active Member 10 Years of Activity

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    I haven't a clue as to which cultivar it is; got it from a friend down the street. It sends up shoots that are easy to pull out to propagate; that's how we got the second, almost equally large, plant. Starts out pale and turns a melon colour. Then the spent blooms droop like Grandma's drawers and fall off...

    Had to get rid of a gigantic jade plant to make room for these guys in the greenhouse over winter. That's why I am interested in the cutting-back idea--to make them more manageable.

    The perfume on our deck is a combination of the petunias and the brugmansia. Very nice!
     
  12. Dylan G

    Dylan G Active Member

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    My Brugmansia have recovered well after severe pruning. I typically let the frost do its thing on mine, then will then prune them to remove damaged wood and to shape them. As for you guys in colder climates with shorter growing seasons I don't know if your plants would have enough time to regrow and flower after being pruned way back.
     
  13. WesternWilson

    WesternWilson Active Member 10 Years of Activity

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    They don't! You have to be really careful with the pruning here in coastal BC as if you are likely to get a fair amount of dieback over the winter, unless the plant is in a warm spot. Even in our above freezing garage, it is hard to preserve the summer's growth. I take some cuttings if that is consistent with shaping the plant and leave it at that.
     
  14. parkeey

    parkeey Active Member

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    ok so i guess mine is a bit woody but how did it get like this in the first place as i bought it like this????? why didnt they prune it at the nursery.......... so u rekon air layer both stems to get fresh bushier brugs with more flowers i suppose.. and see if the old stems bush up again is this rite
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2008
  15. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years of Activity

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    Here's a couple of late summer Brugmansia pics from my yard. The variegated one ('Snow drift') is about a week away from flowering at the moment.

    Cheers, Barrie (LPN).
     

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  16. edleigh7

    edleigh7 Well-Known Member

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    Nice one Barrie. Thats strange mine is about a week away from flowering in the southern hemisphere, but then again mine blooms every 2 months or so

    Ed
     
  17. Debby

    Debby Active Member 10 Years of Activity

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    The variegated one is very handsome! Post again when it flowers.
     
  18. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years of Activity

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    Yes ... these do have a bloom cycle, flowering heavily and no so at alternating times.
    Debby ... will do. As previously stated, a week or so before it flowers.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  19. Debby

    Debby Active Member 10 Years of Activity

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    The gingers and banana are very impressive too!
     
  20. parkeey

    parkeey Active Member

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    its not frosty yet, but maybe in a few months, shall i dig it up, or is it best to take loads of cuttings? i like to keep it quite tall and bushy on top, so can grow stuff underneath them, so do recommend dig up or cut ??? also if i wanted to keep it this tall do i have to chop it back a bit anyway? please help

    heres a pic (bushed out loads hey) sorry its dark
     

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    Last edited: Oct 16, 2008

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