composted horse manure/dirt mix

Discussion in 'Soils, Fertilizers and Composting' started by Creeping Jenny, Apr 26, 2008.

  1. Creeping Jenny

    Creeping Jenny Active Member

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    Will this super stink if I put it in my garden, or is it okay because it is composted?

    Thanks!
     
  2. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Shouldn't stink, but weeds could be a problem due to undigested seeds if the manure is on the surface. Sheep or cow manure does seem better with less weed seed germination, seeds digested better it seems.
     
  3. Creeping Jenny

    Creeping Jenny Active Member

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    Ah that makes sense! Thanks!
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Go have a sniff before buying. Why did you think you need it? Maybe you have actually built the garden enough up already. Not possible to say if there will be issues with buying this stuff and dumping it on your garden without examining particular product being considered as well as current condition of your beds.

    You may like to scroll down to, open and have a look at pdf file titled Myth: Healthy Soil Has High Organic Content to help you judge your situation.

    http://www.puyallup.wsu.edu/~Linda Chalker-Scott/Horticultural Myths_files/index.html
     
  5. Creeping Jenny

    Creeping Jenny Active Member

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  6. Gardenlover

    Gardenlover Active Member

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    I think horse manure causes more weeds than chicken manure. Please correct me if I'm wrong
     
  7. Gardenlover

    Gardenlover Active Member

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    very interesting article....wow!

    basically it says when you add store bought soil e.t.c. to native soil it will eventually wear away years down the road.

    Two years ago I added tons of manure to my garden and actually raised the soil level. Going by this article, it will return to it's original level of native soil years down the road?
     
  8. Creeping Jenny

    Creeping Jenny Active Member

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    We finally have a back yard instead of a condo patio so I started my first big veggie garden instead of using pots. We used a rototiller on the side of the house (was just grass) to make the bed. I just thought it might need something else. I started a compost bin too but that will take a while to be ready. The worms seem to like the soil. I cant even describe how many are in there!
     
  9. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    With vegetable gardens it's usual to add compost etc. if the soil isn't already suitable when getting them started, then periodically add more as needed to maintain the desired humus and nutrient levels. But this can be overdone, same as with other planting - there are limits beyond which a counterproductive outcome begins to occur - despite frequent exhortations to the contrary. Sampling and testing of soil should be undertaken both before creation of a vegetable plot and after, so there is some idea of what the situation on a particular site may be. Soils vary form one spot to the next, even on the same property, and effects of liberal applications of organic soil amendments and other nutrient sources should be monitored for best results.
     
  10. ManureMaiden

    ManureMaiden Member

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    Hi Gardenlover,
    If we are talking about raw manure then it is true that horses have a less "rigorous" digestive system so they can pass on viable weed seeds in their manure. However, you really want to get COMPOSTED horse manure rather than raw manure for two reasons:

    1. The composting process kills most of the weed seeds you don't want in your compost (piles should reach between 55-65 degrees Celsius or 90-140 degrees Fahrenheit for a few consecutive days which ensure the weed seeds are not viable)

    2. The nutrients in composted manure are more readily available to the plants in an on-demand basis/slow release way since the composted manure is stable (raw manure is going to try and compost when you spread it and could actually rob your soil of nitrogen that it needs to complete the composting process)

    Hope this is helpful!
    _____
    Manure Maiden
    www.manurelink.com
     

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