Black spots on tomatoes

Discussion in 'Fruit and Vegetable Gardening' started by waylyn, Jul 20, 2006.

  1. waylyn

    waylyn Member

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    Re: Toggling the Right Sidebar

    When planting tomatoes in the ground, what would be the best fertilize. I have noticed black spots on my tomatoes before they turn completely red(or ripen). Would a certain kind of fertilize prevent this. The tomatoes are not getting very big neither.
     
  2. shelli

    shelli Active Member

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    Tomatoes grow well if you plant them with composted cow manure. Dig a hole about a foot deep and wide and mix in a large shovel-full of manure. If your plants are already in the ground you can fertilize with Miracle Grow about every two weeks. If you live in a dry area you can build a little dirt trough around your plants so that you can adaquately water them. Tomatoes like even water and if you get periods of drought followed by heavy rains your tomatoes my split open. Tomatoes get different kinds of black spots. All can be cut off after you pick the tomato and the rest of the tomato should taste fine. One common problem is blossom end rot. If the black spot is on the bottom of the tomato where the blossom had originally been it will grow in size, somewhat sunken in appearance. This is caused by a lack of calcium. You can buy a calcium spray to spray right on your plants which will help stop and prevent this. Again, once the tomato ripens you can cut off the black spot. Tomatoes also have black spots that look more like lines, crevice or zipper-like appearance. This is called catfacing and can be caused by anything that damages the fruit at the beginning of its development:cold, heat, low moisture, too much nitrogen. These spots are unsightly but can be cut off before eating. Also, make sure your tomatoes are tied up off the ground, as slugs love to dine on them if they lay on the soil.
     

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