Alpine Garden: Arctostaphylos manzanita

Discussion in 'Photographs' started by Daniel Mosquin, Mar 21, 2003.

  1. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    UBC Accession #6487-0156-1973
    Section: North America
    Photo by Daniel Mosquin
    March 21, 2003
     

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    Last edited: Sep 11, 2003
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Same accession
    Photo by Daniel Mosquin
    June 25, 2004
    (Canon 300D)
     

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  3. maricela

    maricela Member

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    Hello!

    I was admiring the images you posted for Arctostaphylos manzanita. I live in northern california (nicasio-pt. reyes area) and I was wondering how the manzanita does with wind? I just bought a 2 ft. manzanita from the mendocino botanical gardens and just wanted to make sure I put in the right spot. What do you reccomend?

    Thanks.

    Maricela
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Looks very dead in the second pic - what happened to it?
     
  5. Dee M.

    Dee M. Active Member 10 Years

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    I don't live in that area but when I was in CA some of the best looking Manzanitas I saw were right above the shore where they got constant wind. It made me very jealous and I wish I could grow them but they must have very well drained soil that I don't have. I went to the Mendocino Botanical Gardens once and found it very interesting, particularly the Tea Trees, Leptospermum.
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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  7. growest

    growest Active Member 10 Years

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    Re: Dead Arctostaphylos manzanita

    Michael--that big old manzanita has been dead since the cold snap of Jan/04. I guess I'm assuming it was the cold, and not wet/fungus that did it in but that was the timing of it's demise. I understand it's on the northern edge of it's hardiness zone up here.

    The old trunk still looks cool in the alpine garden, and I think I saw another specimen planted nearby perhaps as a bit of a replacement.

    Glen
     
  8. maricela

    maricela Member

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    Good to know. Can't wait to plant my Manzanita.
     
  9. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Look at the Seattle photo for a big 'ol manzanita. Vashon Botanical Garden, west of Seattle has one as well. This particular species grows about 20' high. Local nurseries have had smaller, possibly hybrid cultivar 'Dr Hurd' recently. For detailed history and description see

    http://www.stanford.edu/~rawlings/PDF/003.pdf

    'Dr. Hurd' is on pp. 11-12.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2005
  10. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Just saw another one in a Seattle garden, over my head in height. Common manzanita seems to be more tractable here than others.
     
  11. Brent A. Hine

    Brent A. Hine Active Member UBC Botanical Garden 10 Years

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    Hi, I'm growing/did grow that big A. manzanita in the alpine garden here at UBCBG. Its interesting that someone mentioned wind, as it used to be much more symmetrical. During a wind storm a few years ago the south half (main stem) broke off near ground level. Having said that, the plant was already very old, the inner part of that stem had been dead for some time. After that, it went slowly downhill. Because it always bloomed heavily and fruited well, I had it propagated by cuttings and there are now two sturdy replacements nearby. So probably what did it in was a combination of wind, cold and wet being too much in old age. There is quite excellent drainage where it was living.
     
  12. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    How old was it? An Arctostophylos columbiana 15' across growing on the edge of the cliffs above Granite Falls, Snohomish Co., WA was vandalized some years ago, about half its main branches being cut out of the center. I counted 60 rings in one of the stumps.
     
  13. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Just over 30 years old - it was a 1973 accession.
     

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