Zone map link down?

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by Roger Priddle, Feb 3, 2009.

  1. Roger Priddle

    Roger Priddle Member

    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    ON
    Hi - I'm a newbie. (I know, who cares...) but I'm actually new to the board, new to gardening and new to the whole concept of being a "locavore". But I'm keen - well, not too keen on the actual gardening part. But I have a very co-operative local farmer <smile>).

    I tried to use the link on the right side to find my "hardiness zone" but it just dies. I live on Georgian Bay, across the water from Collingwood and I'm stuck with slow dial-up so maybe that's a factor? Anyway, if someone can find the zone for Perkinsfield ON it would be nice to know.

    Actual question about plants in next message.

    TIA
     
  2. K Baron

    K Baron Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,032
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    North Vancouver, B.C., Canada
    I believe zone 4b ...and welcome to the forums
     
  3. Roger Priddle

    Roger Priddle Member

    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    ON
    K Baron - many thanks for the information and the welcome. Dumb question - does the zone matter on all plants? Local farmer says he buys corn for 20 acres and they just seem to differentiate between north or south of 35th Parallel.

    And I guess the next dumb question would be how sensitive the zones are - ie is there a huge difference between 4A and 4B in practical terms?

    Thanks again.

    Roger
     
  4. K Baron

    K Baron Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,032
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    North Vancouver, B.C., Canada
    Zones matter only as far as min/max temps or the maximum serious freeze... all gardens/yards have micro climates such that some plants that could never grow in a zone 5 may grow in a zone 4, it all depends on the plant, where and how it is planted, winter exposure, summer exposure... so many variables here. You may wish to consult the local horticulturist at a nursery, or a master gardener or your happy, friendly gardener next door...... for specific plant requirements in your locale.
     
  5. Roger Priddle

    Roger Priddle Member

    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    ON
    Again, many thanks. Not sure there are a lot of master gardeners around here - think of me as living outside Brackendale, or Hope, or someplace like that. (Except no mountains.) The farmers around here have 200 years of practical experience but modified in the last 50 years by the influence of Monsanto et al. That's what makes the Internet so great.

    For practical purposes, how sensitive are vegetables to "hardiness Zones" (as opposed to flowers and ornamentals)? My primary interest is in food crops with an emphasis on day to day nutrition, not specialty items.

    Roger
     
  6. K Baron

    K Baron Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,032
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    North Vancouver, B.C., Canada
    Full sun, raised beds, manure infused, go gang busters on your veggie patch!

    Incidentally, there is a fashionably new, style of plant and crop rotation much like horticultural husbandry out there, the name escapes me, however only heirloom varieties are grown amongst the vineyards at Summer Hill Winery in BC.. look them up...they may have some relevant answers for you too!
     
  7. Roger Priddle

    Roger Priddle Member

    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    ON
    Once again, many thanks. I assume the name you're thinking of is not either "companion planting" or "permaculture". (I know the terms, just don't really know what they mean. There's a place about 2 hours away that wants me to go to "permaculture seminars".)

    Our home is right on a beach - think Long Beach but fresh water. All soil has to be either brought in or built from sand and compost. But a little herb garden did well last summer - still using lemon grass, parsley and sage, ran out of thyme and oregano. Hoping that some survive the winter and that, if they do, I recognize them when they come up in the spring.)

    Will check out Summer Hill Winery site - see if they talk about it.
     

Share This Page