Zone 2 Plants

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by Daniel Mosquin, May 28, 2003.

  1. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Location:
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    The following was received via email:

    Hello,
    I was wondering where I can get information as to which plants - perennials, shrubs and fruit trees - that will do well in Zone 2 conditions. I am trying to find things that will do well in the 100 Mile House area and was told that although the area is listed as Zone 4, the conditions are actually Zone 2. I am hoping to find some type of apple trees that will survive.

    Thank you for your assistance.
     
  2. HortLine

    HortLine Active Member 10 Years

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    Apple trees (fruiting varieties) are listed as hardy from zones 4 to 8, though there are a few crabapple species that are hardy to Zone 2. If you want to grow an apple tree, however, it isn't impossible! Planting the tree on a south facing slope with good drainage and protection from winter winds can raise the microclimate of an area, to the point that you may have success with apples. It can bve quite amazing what you can grow in lower zones if you put plants in just the right places. I would suggest that the best place to look for plants that will survive your conditions would be a local nursery, if you have one, or in seed catalogues such as McFayden, West Coast Seeds, or Thompson and Morgan, if you want a few names to get started with.
     
  3. reply

    Contact Holes Greenhouses in St. Alberta , Alberta 1-888-884-6537 as they have On Line Selecion (Web) and Phone (Customer Service). They can also ship plants. Lois Hole is the Owner with related books on the Market.


     
  4. T. Shane Freeman

    T. Shane Freeman Active Member

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    Location:
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    I too agree that a nursery or greenhouse is sometimes the best place for a hobby/weekend gardener or tree enthusiast to start when looking to find the 'right plant for their location'.

    Nurseries typically offer some sort of warranty policy on the stock that they sell. On all nursery stock that I supply, I offer a 'one year from the time of planting warranty'. This allows the stock to face exposure from all four of 'Mother Nature's' seasons and it is an excellent testimonial that the tree/shrub/vine/perennial is suited to the location it was sold to. Now if a nursery was pushing the sales of materials that were not hardy to the area, they would be facing some serious rebates the following year. And if their management was wise, they would not want to sell themselves out of a job!
     

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