Yuzu citrus - overwintering?

Discussion in 'Fruit and Nut Trees' started by Megami, Aug 19, 2012.

  1. Megami

    Megami Active Member 10 Years

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    I have a small yuzu citrus tree which I bought this spring. It's planted in a container and seems quite healthy, but I'm starting to wonder how I should overwinter it. I know they are semi-hardy and can stand some freezing temperatures, but I'm not sure how well they do during winter in a container. Should I wrap the container? Use lights to keep it warm? Bury the container? Or just bring it inside.. any advice would be appreciated.
     

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  2. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    I would move it indoors but it could also be placed into a suitably sized plastic covered greenhouse outside along with a heat source like an incandescent bulb, something like that seen [post=68432]here[/post].
     
  3. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Last edited: Nov 3, 2015
  4. Megami

    Megami Active Member 10 Years

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    Thanks for the info - I think I might try to keep it outside with lights.. I don't really have a good place for it indoors :/
     
  5. elgordo

    elgordo Active Member

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    Can't you plant it in the ground? Mine did fine last winter in-ground.
     
  6. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    That might work. From what's I've read yuzu is comparable to trifoliate orange in terms of cold hardiness. Still I would be cautious of exposure to an extended period of cold which is possible in Vancouver. I believe containerized trees would be more susceptible. A young tree that has not had a full season to put down roots may also encounter problems. I would be interested in knowing how your tree does over the long term. Yours is the only one I know of that is being grown outdoors in our area.
     
  7. elgordo

    elgordo Active Member

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    I will certainly keep you posted. Yuzu definitely needs to be kept in a sheltered, well-drained place - I planted mine against the house under the gutters. The only problem with this location is that it gets too dry in the summer and I have to water daily. Yuzu will also drop its leaves when it gets extremely cold (-8 or -9) but will pick up where it left off the following spring. It's never happened to mine as it has only been in the ground for two years and the house provided enough shelter for it, but I've heard of others in Surrey whose Yuzus dropped their leaves during the winter and grew like weeds in the spring; I guess the term would be "semi-deciduous". They do have Poncirus rootstocks too which help.
     
  8. elgordo

    elgordo Active Member

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    The shrub should be heavily protected if you plant it now, though - Junglekeeper is right about the unestablished roots. It should be planted in a western or southern exposure sheltered from north winds and close to an electrical outlet to facilitate a string of X-mas lights. Here's a good site with some good advice for protecting citrus: http://www.cloudforest.com/cafe/cit...-with-yuzu-oranges-t769.html?hilit=Yuzu#p5046
     
  9. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Are there many people in Surrey growing yuzu? Is there a story behind this? Have they had success in getting their trees to grow and bear fruit? Any pictures?
     
  10. elgordo

    elgordo Active Member

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    I know of one other person in Surrey growing them but there are several others throughout the PNW who have succesfully grown them. If you look at that website, The Cloudforest Cafe - Discussions - Northwest Palms and type in "Yuzu" in the search box you'll see all kinds of anecdotes, advice and photos of Yuzu shrubs. I'll try to post a pic of mine later on this website.
     
  11. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Thanks. I may start to monitor that forum for citrus threads.
     
  12. Patibbishwa

    Patibbishwa Member

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    Where did you buy your Yuzu from
     
  13. Megami

    Megami Active Member 10 Years

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  14. Patibbishwa

    Patibbishwa Member

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  15. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Quick look at the internet brings up commercial sources talking about survival of brief episodes of 10-15 degrees F., which puts it about on the level of various common ornamental shrubs like Mexican orange, orchid rock rose, California lilac and 'Frades' escallonia which grow fine for sometimes many years - only to die back or die out entirely when it gets colder than that.

    As it inevitably does, unless you are right at the beach - and in an area where the winds coming down the Fraser don't still push your temperatures down into single digits.

    Any sites claiming to show proven hardy examples in this region should be viewed with knowledge of how long the specimens shown have been in place, what, if any special protective measures have been used to keep them going, and how cold it has gotten on those particular sites since the shrubs were planted.

    Keeping in mind that the latter point can be affected by people sometimes actually having inaccurate thermometers.
     
  16. elgordo

    elgordo Active Member

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    RonB, four winters on and still going strong with no protection, despite -10C temperatures.
     
  17. elgordo

    elgordo Active Member

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    And that doesn't mean it's not worth trying. If it gets smoked by a cold winter, I'd just buy another one and enjoy it for however long it lasts. It's the same story for my olive tree, my Camellia sinensis, my Acca sellowiana, and many other bushes that have been in the ground for the last four or five years.
     
  18. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Unlike with the others listed individual tea camellia bushes that have been present for decades are known in the region.
     
  19. elgordo

    elgordo Active Member

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    Absolutely. My point is that for some people it's worth it to put a little more effort into protecting certain species of plants just for the novelty of having them in their gardens. In Quebec many people protect their roses and even their cedar hedges which often requires much time and effort. Despite the hassle, it's worth it for them. Sometimes their rosebushes kick it during a particularly harsh winter but they'll start all over again because for them the beauty of the specimen far outweighs the hassle of replacing it every five years or so.
    That being said, I believe it's necessary for nurseries and gardening websites to be forthright about the tenderness of such plants. It should be explained to potential buyers that these are somewhat risky specimens to purchase and that there is a lot of work to maintain them. It's a real problem with some of these websites, for sure.
     
  20. Delvi83

    Delvi83 Active Member

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    Yuzu is very cold-hardy to be a Citrus (even if an Hybrid)...when adult it should survive -12°/-15° with few damage.....anyway your is very young and it's in pot....I advice you to wrap the pot with cartons, leaves or other...to maintain an higher root's temperature.
    You can put your pot in the south side of your home, near to a wall.....as Yuzu become bigger as you'll have less problems..
     

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