Identification: Yew tree

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers)' started by Rick Lee, Jul 29, 2019.

  1. Rick Lee

    Rick Lee New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Victoria
    We are looking for assistance in making a definitive identification of an older Yew tree. We believe it is about 80 years old dbh about 2 feet (60 cm), height about 40-45 feet (14-15m), shedding trunk and branch bark - reddish and smooth underneath bark, never (in 20 years) has had nor currently has red berries, needles somewhat twisted circular around the twig, not really flat either ... Pacific, Western, English, Irish ... yew?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

    Messages:
    302
    Likes Received:
    60
    Location:
    Estonia
    I think, that this is a Pacific/Western Yew (Taxus brevifolia, Pacific Yew=Western Yew, they are synonyms)
    I'm afraid, that you underestimate the age, I suppose it's at least 2 times higher than 80 years, probably even more times higher. But you overestimate the height and DBH. From the photo, it seems, that the height is around 10 m and the DBH is ca 50 cm.
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    19,703
    Likes Received:
    167
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    More like T. cuspidata or T. x media for me. With it being a planted specimen and not a native one predating modern human occupation of the site. And note that yew species are told apart by details such as of shape of bud scales and leaf tips. Neither of which can be seen in your photos.
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    10,675
    Likes Received:
    144
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    Agree with Ron here, except that I don't think T. baccata can be excluded either.
     
  5. Rick Lee

    Rick Lee New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Victoria
    I presume we have to wait until fall (or spring?) until the buds form ... not being a plant oriented person.
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    19,703
    Likes Received:
    167
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Species descriptions and background information can be found here:

    Taxus (yew) description

    Winter buds form in time to be present during winter. In terms of increase in length most root growth of cold climate adapted plants occurs after winter buds have formed, sent hormones to the existing root tips which cause them to elongate. So winter buds will always have matured early enough for the roots to have had this growth push before it becomes too cold and wet - winter is basically a period of hibernation for cold climate woody plants. At least as far as their roots are concerned.
     

Share This Page