yellow mustard seed

Discussion in 'Annuals, Biennials, Perennials, Ferns and Bulbs' started by trishmarg, Jun 15, 2007.

  1. trishmarg

    trishmarg Member

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    Hello,
    I was given some yellow mustard seed. I have read that garlic mustard is invasive, and would like to know if anyone has grown this, and what the plant requirements are?

    Thanks, Trish
     
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Yellow mustard is different from garlic mustard - in fact, they are in different genera of plants (so relatively speaking, somewhat distant relatives).

    Don't be fooled by the common name on the latter, as far as I know, it won't help produce a garlicky-flavoured mustard - it's the smell of the leaves that resemble garlic: Alliaria petiolata

    As for what species your yellow mustard is, it depends. If it's the one used to make typical mustard pastes, you have Sinapis alba, aka white mustard. Other plants known as yellow mustard include Brassica hirta and Brassica rapa var. campestris.
     
  3. trishmarg

    trishmarg Member

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    Thank you so much for the information and links. I appreciate it very much.

    Trish
     
  4. biggam

    biggam Active Member

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    If you grow this, make sure to harvest the seed, because it could become a weed. Another option is to use it as a cover crop to improve your soil, possibly sowing it late in the summer after a short-season crop like cucumber or snap beans. Winter temperatures should kill it before it can set seed, else simply cut it down when it is flowering. Brassica species like this, oriental mustard, oilseed radish, etc. are being extensively studied for their benefits of reducing soil pathogens and weeds, suppressing nematodes, and other soil-improving qualities.
     

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