Wollemi Pine

Discussion in 'Araucariaceae' started by LPN, Sep 22, 2007.

  1. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Well ... I was able to obtain Wollemia nobilis thanks to Lori at Jurassic Plants Nursery http://www.jurassicplantsnursery.com
    A very healthy specimen standing 19" tall complete with certificate of authenticity.
    A real treat to have this rare tree and to meet Lori. I only wish I had more time to spend at her nursery today.

    Cheers, LPN.
     

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  2. Joy Cooper

    Joy Cooper Active Member

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    Congratulations. Your specimen certainly does look healthy & you have made a wise decision in getting one. Ours' still looks good also & is our pride & joy. Enjoy yours' as much as we enjoy our Wollemi.
     
  3. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Thanks Joy!,
    I have many Australian native plants/trees around my garden and this will compliment the rest nicely.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  4. Joy Cooper

    Joy Cooper Active Member

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    Hi LPN. I know this has nothing to to do with Wollemi pines, but thought I would let you know that the bottlebrush (callistemom) in our yard is in full bloom, as are the others around town, to the delight of the honeyeaters. Grevilleas bloom all year round & there is always one or more banksias in flower @ different times of the year. Melaleucas flower whenever they feel like it (which means hayfever season for me is on). Hope you enjoy your Australian native plants.
     
  5. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Awesome Joy! Great to know the plants are performing as best for you and within local sites. We're sliding into Autumn now in the Northern hemishpere, so blooms are non-existant. There are many growers of Callistemon, Melaleucas & Banksia in the milder regions around the PNW (Pacific Northwest) coastal areas.
     
  6. neonrider

    neonrider Active Member

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    My zone is 8A (South Carolina Midlands, Orangeburg County). I bought Wollemi from NG last winter and kept it in a pot and kept moving it from shade to a sun and it got a bit yellowish. Then this autumn I planted it into the ground giving it some space and some shade, actually it's mostly shade, but it may get some afternoon sun. It got slightly more yellowish green and some of it's tips became yellow and some leaves have brown spots. Our winters get about -1C to +16C with occasional night time or morning temperatures down to -5C or even -7C but not often. Do you think it might die this winter even if in Zone 8A or should I leave it in the ground and not worry? Or should I put it back into the pot and bring it inside the house for the winter? The tree when arrived from NG was barely 5 inches tall from ground up and now it is about 8 inches and a bit wider, has not grown much in almost a year, but added some branches. Should I still keep it in the house for winter until it reaches certain size or is it ok to leave it in the ground in my zone?
     
  7. Joy Cooper

    Joy Cooper Active Member

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    Hi neonrider. Maybe you have been moving your Wollemi pine around too much. I know it is only too easy to fuss over them but they have survived in the wild for aeons :). They can be over watered & do not like wet feet, are drought-hardy & will tolerate temp ranges of between -5C to 45C. Mine has been going through a huge growth spurt as it is spring here & has shot up another 15cm (6ins) with every branch sending out new growth. It was 60cm (2ft) when we bought it a few months ago, it is still in a pot as we do not have a yard to place it in. I fertilise mine with fish emulsion. Check out the official website for more info:- www.wollemipine.com that may help you. All the best for your very special tree.
     

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  8. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Not too good an idea; they don't get much of that in their native gorge. It could encourage fungal diseases. Also not very good for fish, either.
     
  9. Joy Cooper

    Joy Cooper Active Member

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    My Wollemi Pine happens to be thriving on it & it is recommended for Aust natives. Most of it is made from the very invasive feral carp, introduced from the Northern Hemisphere, where most of our feral species originate. We prefer them to be of some use rather than destroying our waterways for the native fish. It was, also, not a direction, just a mention of what I use to keep my tree happy. Now I remember why I have not been frequenting this Forum lately, it is because of pedants who suck dry all the enjoyment that belonging to these Forums usually brings.
     
  10. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Sorry if you feel offput - I should mention though that damage to fish populations by industrial fishing for fishmeal is a major environmental issue here and in many other parts of the world (resulting in massive collapse in seabird numbers in many areas). You might feel the same if someone had for example, suggested killing koalas (or enter other endangered native species of your choice) for use as a fertiliser. Thanks for the clarification on what you are using!
     
  11. neonrider

    neonrider Active Member

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    Joy thanks. After reading the www.wollemipine.com I have come here seeking more information. I found that www.wollemipine.com is lacking essential info on growing the Wollemia Nobilis (also non-commercially known as the "Little Aussie"). While the www.wollemipine.com site has basic info, but it laks a forum and more "live" info and knowledge base. I think my tree got yellowish from exposure to sun rather than moving it as I wasn't moving it too much, but now I wonder if I did it ok by planting it into the ground in October and whether I should bring it into the house for the "winter" or just cover around it with leaves.
     
  12. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    From the Age/ Melbourne
    Australian native seeds sent into orbit
    August 7, 2008 - 9:16AM


    http://news.theage.com.au/national/australian-native-seeds-sent-into-orbit-20080807-3r9f.html

    Liz

    The Wollemi pine has spread around the world since it was discovered in Australia almost 15 years ago and now it's gaining a foothold in space.

    Seeds from the so-called jurassic pine, along with other native plant species, have been sent into orbit in an experiment that will test how well they could be stored on a space station to ensure against a disaster or environmental cataclysm on Earth.

    Executive director of the Botanic Gardens Trust, Tim Entwisle, said 2,500 Golden Wattle, NSW Waratah, Flannel Flower and Wollemi Pine seeds were currently aboard the NASA Discovery Mission en route to the International Space Station.

    The experiment, being conducted by NASA and the Botanic Gardens Trust, was designed to study the effects of radiation and changed gravity on the seeds, Dr Entwisle said.

    Dr Entwisle said the research held implications for the possible future storage of seeds in space.

    "With habitats under increasing threat, conservation seed banking is an important strategy for both storing and understanding genetically important wild seeds," he said.

    "This experiment could lead to some ground-breaking research by providing a preliminary evaluation of Space Station seed banking - a possible option for the future".

    A space seed bank would add to existing native seed banks at Mt Annan Botanic Gardens in Sydney and the UK-based Millennium Seed bank in Kew.

    "An insurance policy for the world could be to have some (seeds) up in space as well," he said.

    The research would also provide information about planting food and vegetation on other planets - either as a food source or to create an Earth-like "biosphere".

    The US, Russia and China have sent grain and vegetable seeds up into space, but this is a first for Australian natives.

    Previous experiments have focused on the genetic changes space conditions trigger in plants.

    "The results so far have been a bit mixed," Dr Entwisle said.

    "One of the things that has been reported from China is that the radiation has led to giant vegetables and changes in the genetic structure."

    The China Daily reported last year that space-bred tomato and green pepper seeds resulted in harvests 10-20 per cent larger than ordinary seeds, and that vegetables grown from space-bred seeds have a higher vitamin content.

    Dr Entwisle said Australian plants were extremely hardy because they were adapted to extreme conditions like drought and fire.

    This made them potentially less susceptible to the effects of being in space. If so, they would be well suited for storage and cultivation in a space ship or on another planet.

    "Our hypothesis is that the trip in space for six months won't have any major impact on these very tough, resilient seeds," he said.

    "They might be the sort of things we would take up into space not only for food but also if we're looking at producing oxygen in space or setting up micro-climates."

    The seeds have been in space since Discovery launched on May 31. They will return to earth at the end of November.

    © 2008 AAP
     
  13. neonrider

    neonrider Active Member

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    My "Wollemi Pine" purchased from National Geographic (and delivered half the size as described) has died this winter no matter how well I took care of it. My zone is 8A (Mid SC) about 80 miles from coast. Don't believe it's a plant for non-tropical environment. It is a tropical plant and will not survive outdoors unless you plant it in the tropics. Don't buy from National Geographic.
     
  14. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I dont think you can hold the supplier as responsible if you state previously that it was a condition of cold hardiness that was the problem. Unless of course they misrepresented the facts.
     
  15. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I think that's Neonrider's point, that NG have done so. They claim hardiness down to something like -12°C, which I suspect is highly unlikely other than in exceptionally sheltered conditions with only the briefest of dips to that temperature (maybe tested in a refrigerated room?). I'd doubt the species can be relied on anywhere that temperatures regularly get below -5°C outdoors.
     
  16. neonrider

    neonrider Active Member

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    This winter low temperatures in my place dipped to -8C (as usual) for a couple of nights, otherwise it's been at or above freezing with exception of few nights with -1C to maybe -4C temperatures. Day temperatures usually around 60F (+16C). In fact I protected the Wollemia Nobilis with roof coverings from wind from two sides, so it was well sheltered from wind yet it received sun and water. It was planted in Orangeburg county which has almost a subtropical climate. Yet the tree has clearly dried up and died no matter how well I watered it (I made sure not to overwater it). It was doing very well indoors, but as soon as I planted it outdoors it completely hated it and died.

    I would tag this tree as TROPICAL, not to be placed in temperatures below +4C and even with +4C or above avoid windy conditions. NG has refunded my money, but I wasted my time and effort, and I still must put this notice for everyone who is considering buying anything from National Geographic. I also unsubcribed from NG magazine as well.

    From my Wollemia Nobilis only it's "passport" remains: Certificate of Authenticity # 05490 - is now officially dead. Let's bury it with sorrow. I shed a tear once again (;-;)

    I've also noticed that any company I've had pleasure of dealing with which had "American", "All American" or "National" in it's name, had severe problems with service and/or quality.
     
  17. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Humm interesting ... mine's doin' fine here in Canada two years running.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  18. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Last edited: Aug 12, 2008
  19. neonrider

    neonrider Active Member

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    Wow, perhaps you live near water in Vancouver or Victoria. I also guess, perhaps mine got too much sun in sunny South Carolina or didn't like the soil or too dry climate, just like a woman. It started visually drying up and dying after it hit -8C a couple nights last winter. It clearly died from low temperatures as I was watching it. Expensive tree to fool around if you are not spending days, weeks and months learning how to grow it. Best if kept indoors, unless above freezing climate. I read the site it's been found at does not have below freezing temperature. That explains it. And I bought it with NG note that it will survive down to -12C or even below. They shouldn't state that, to be safe, they should say, never below freezing; got me disappointed with NG completely. I guess they are struggling to survive, because internet cut down into most profits for magazines alike. Then some cheating is ok to such ones, but not for me. I better stay hungry than cheat. It really hurts, I wasted whole year, saw it growing up to the size i was supposed to receive it at..... and then it died (when moved outside in a near-subtropical inland climate where palm trees grow fine), felt double-cheated by NG. The only source for Wollemi Pine in the US is still National Geographic. Or are there alternatives? I may buy one again and keep it indoors.

    cheers

    JJ
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2008
  20. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    our local garden center has them. in 6" pots about 18" high, near $150 or so.
     
  21. neonrider

    neonrider Active Member

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    Do you deliver to the US? I'm not driving for 2 weeks to get it :-) Can someone confirm whether there is some place who sells these trees in USA or are all Wollemia Nobilis sales monopolised by National Geographic?
     
  22. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    http://www.ancientpine.com/ looks like in the US its national geographic only. To ship from Canada requires import permits (phytosanitary) but I dont know about Customs rules for this particular plant.
     
  23. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    It pays to shop around for this plant. There were some similar sized ones at another local garden center selling for $60. In the past, smaller ones were going for $40.
     
  24. neonrider

    neonrider Active Member

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    It™ is™ weird™ that™ in™ a™ free™ market™ society™ such™ as™ USA™ the™ only™ source™ for™ Wollemia™ Nobilis™ is™ National™ Geographic™. Canada™ has™ a™ variety™ of™ sources™ now™, USA™ has™ (n)one™.

    P.S.™ To™ avoid™ potential™ lawsuits™ I™ have™ marked™ every™ word™ with™ "™" cause™ you™ never™ know™. :-)™ From™ now™ on™ to™ be™ safe™ I™ will™ type™ everything™ in™ this™ manner™ if™ you™ don't™ mind™.

    Wollemi™ Wollemi™ Wollemi™ Wollemi™ Wollemi™ Wollemi™ Wollemi™ Wollemi™ Wollemi™ Wollemi™

    Interesting™ story™:

    http://www.blognow.com.au/gumnuts/49502/Trademarking_Wollemi_Pine.html

    Wollemi™ Wollemi™ Wollemi™ Wollemi™ Wollemi™ Wollemi™ Wollemi™ Wollemi™ Wollemi™ Wollemi™
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2008
  25. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    point taken. ;-)
     

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