Willing to try.

Discussion in 'Organic Gardening' started by LPN, Sep 13, 2008.

  1. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,522
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Courtenay, Vancouver Island
    I'm in the initial process of designing a home organic garden on a portion of our half acre property. I don't think I'll have much difficulty with fruit trees etc, but vegetables are something I've very rarely grown and not for quite some time.
    Any do's and don'ts from the experienced home grown gardeners are welcome. I can dedicate about an hour a day on average tending to the garden. District watering restrictions in the peak of summer are limited to 2 hours a week.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  2. growing4it

    growing4it Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    322
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    vancouver to langley, bc
    Since your starting a home organic garden for food, choose to grow things that you like to eat. Start small and manageable then expand the garden as you grow in confidence and enthusiasm. Get a hold of the WestCoast Seeds mailorder catalogue, they are based in Delta BC and their catalogue has great advice. Are deer and rabbits are problem? You may want to look into fencing your garden. Good Luck!
     
  3. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,522
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Courtenay, Vancouver Island
    Thanks ... good advise. I remember West Coast Seeds and wondered if they where still around. I've already resigned myself to the fact, fencing is a must. Slugs and snails are another matter which I'll have to deal with.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  4. edleigh7

    edleigh7 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,769
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Brisbane Queensland Australia
    Barrie, for slugs and snails we put out crushed egg shells. They don't seem to like this. Even though it doesn't eliminate them, it does restrict their travels and they can be easily "picked" from their usual haunts. We feed them to the chickens, they lay eggs and the cycle continues ; )
    Some of the bigger snails and slugs that are too much for the chickens are fed to other birds that hang around in our yard

    Ed
     
  5. growest

    growest Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    684
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Surrey,BC,Canada
    Barrie and all--we started down that same road back in 1990 when we moved to our acre here in south Surrey. One of the most helpful things was to get a copy of Steve Solomon's book, Growing Organic Vegetables west of the Cascades...

    Steve started Territorial which split into West Coast up here in Canada, but he is/was a super student of soil and organic stuff, especially applied to our local conditions. His book contains so much more than we can chat about here.

    For slugs/snails, I consider Sluggo acceptable in my garden...I believe it would pass organic standards as well. Definitely don't like the idea of metaldehyde anywhere near my edibles. Have to do another round pretty soon as the cooler weather has hatched out an army of baby molluscs around here...sorry to those who like the beer traps and barriers of various sorts, I'm just too lazy.

    Glen
     
  6. grdnstff

    grdnstff Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    109
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    vancouver island
    hi .. one thing i would suggest to you is pay a lot of attention to your soil .. add lots of manure and/or compost and dig it in .. plant a winter crop of fall rye (anytime now) and let it grow through the winter .. dig it in at least 2 weeks, maybe 3 before you plant in the spring .. the healthier your soil the healthier and happier your plants .. slugs, well, slugs are just a part of gardening .. a habit of slug patrol can't hurt ..
     
  7. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    4,777
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    LPN, you're rural, aren't you? The best form of organic slug and bug control in the veggie patch that I have ever found is a young turkey. The bonus is that is drops fertilizer as it goes (which are easy to trowel in), and is unlikely to eat your lettuces. Plus, you can eat it at Christmas once it's gotten nice and fat on all those slugs. Or not. We've just let ours go. The other nice thing about this method of pest control is that it deters other birds that would normally make a meal of your sprouts. My turkey has a particular fascination for potato beetles and rose weevils, which is more than I can say for any chemical.
     
  8. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,160
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    Dickson, TN
    Another great deterrant for slugs is copper. You can buy rolls of copper foil or copper wire and ring pots or raised beds with it. When the slugs and snails touch it, it produces a tiny electric current (they're moist) that repels them.
     
  9. ghielyn12

    ghielyn12 Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    AL CANADA
    Dave's Garden is an amazing resource for beginning and experienced gardeners alike. Inside, you'll find over 250 forums dedicated to every type of home and gardening topic you can think of. From annuals and bonsai trees to vegetable gardening and winter sowing; from tips on seeds and planting to advice on regional gardening, this is a gold mine of friendly advice and knowledge shared by experienced gardeners from around the world.
     
  10. bob 2

    bob 2 Active Member

    Messages:
    231
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    edmonton
    Thanks for the tip.

    Seems like a very adequate site for the weekend gardener.


    Bob
     

Share This Page