Will my willow tree grow back?

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by treehouse, Oct 29, 2009.

  1. treehouse

    treehouse Member

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    My landscaper just butchered my tree and I'm trying really hard not to freak out. I think my property value just took a dive and my privacy is gone! Does anyone have any knowledge to share with me- I'm really worried I killed my tree. Thanks in advance, Amy
    BEFORE & AFTER

    willowtreebefore.jpg

    willowtree.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 29, 2009
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    It will regrow vigorously next year. The problems are further down the line, in that willow wood, once exposed by cutting, is very prone to decay. So the tree may have had its potential lifespan shortened by 20-40 years or more.
     
  3. treehouse

    treehouse Member

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    Thank you for the reply- how long do willow trees typically live? I'm so bummed I did this.
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Depends a lot on climate; not sure how long it would live in IL. Over here, 50-100 years.
     
  5. treehouse

    treehouse Member

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    I appreciate your replies!
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    It will come right back. Established specimens of kinds with colorful shoots can be pruned down low each year to keep them smaller and more colorful. Since new sprouts from yours may be poorly attached to the remaining branches, sometimes break off later in the tree's development it might be as well to cut it down to a stump and start it over from the bottom early next spring. Of course, if it is then allowed to grow quite large I suppose there might be a danger of entire trunks breaking out at some point, where attached to the main stump!

    The thing is, willow trees are inherently short-lived (as stated above) and in some areas quite prone to cankers and other problems. Depending on how yours might have done on your particular site it might not have been considered an enhancement to your property by many potential buyers even if it had not been lopped.

    If the willow is allowed to grow to full size the conifer on the right and various other currently adjacent elements will soon be overwhelmed.
     

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