Wild willows are diseased

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by Chilcotinwest, Jun 13, 2007.

  1. Chilcotinwest

    Chilcotinwest Member

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    Chilcotin, B.C. Canada
    The wild willows around my home (and I've seen it in other places in the Chilcotin) have some sort of disease--I first noticed it last year. We cut out the dead ones but this year some--not all--of the new growth also is diseased. You can see ant holes in the picture but they appear to move in after the trees have been infected.

    Does anyone know what is happening? Any suggestions on controlling it? How widespread is it?

    There is a wine-red stain under the bark.
     

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    Last edited: Jun 13, 2007
  2. J.Onstott

    J.Onstott Active Member

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    What are the symptoms predeath? Are there any signs of disease in the foliage, or any fruiting bodies near the base of on the stem of the willow? Do you notice any verticle splitting in the bark?
     
  3. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Willows in the wild are naturally short-lived, it is part of their ecology. Hundreds of insects, fungi, etc., use them as food sources. I'd let nature take its course, and not try to stop time in its tracks. Even the dead wood is valuable in a natural ecosystem.
     
  4. J.Onstott

    J.Onstott Active Member

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    they look pretty big, if this is a place they have occurred naturally (and conditions have not drastically changed) they will likely come back.
     
  5. Chilcotinwest

    Chilcotinwest Member

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    The trees I photographed occurred naturally--just happened to be against our house and so grew quite large--but others on our property and throughout our valley show the same symptoms. My concern is that new growth this year shows the same disease.

    It's bad enough losing our pine trees and having our firs and spruces threatened--sure don't want to lose the deciduous trees too!
     

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