Identification: White Unicorn Horn?

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by C.Wick, Mar 30, 2008.

  1. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    Found these little mushrooms....about 4cm tall....in Missouri.....along a 'flood plain'....very dainty with an extreme cone shaped cap. no ring...no idea on the spore. Found in the middle of summer time. No odor that I could smell.
     

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  2. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Possibly a Mycena?
    Do you know if it was growing on the soil, on wood or on the leaf litter itself?
     
  3. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    the stems were attached to the underside of a very rotted dry log.....this area is frequently flooded but at the time was in a 'dry spell'.......
     
  4. Michael Kuo

    Michael Kuo Active Member

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    I hope someone knows what your mushroom is, because I collected what may be the same thing in the fall of 2006, in Illinois. I preserved the collection, but I haven't worked with it yet, so all I can provide is this photo, and my journal entry (below). If I get a chance to study the collection's microscopic features, I'll post again. I was thinking Psathyrella, but, as I said, I haven't spent any time with it yet. The ecology sounds quite similar to your colection.

    Journal entry: "09300601. Odd conical white agaric in brush piles from creek wash; bottomlands (cottonwood, sycamore, maples); scattered. Caps to 13 mm across; acutely conic, with a tiny nipple (like E. salmoneum); at first pure white, becoming slightly grayish; radially, innately, finely fibrillose; somewhat striate. Gills close; some lamellulae near the margin; white, becoming purplish gray but white-marginate (expect cheilocystidia). Stem very fragile; up to 50 x 2 mm; equal; translucent white; exannulate; glabrous above and slightly fibrillose below; base without rhizoids or mycelium. KOH on cap surface negative. Odor of crushed cap not distinctive. Didn't taste."
     

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  5. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    excellent info....thanx for noticing and writing. PLEASE keep me informed if you get the answear and I'll do like-wise! I wonder if the found locations has any distinct property to this type of mushroom? The area where mine was found was also mostly cottonwood/sycamore and maple....river bluffs of the Missouri. The range of ID I was looking towards was a variety of Entoloma? But without any sort of spore that ID can't really be given since I believe those run towards pink? Don't know...but if you get the name...pleeease let me know. Thanx again!
    Carla
     
  6. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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  7. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    I'm not seeing the resemblence to any of the inky cap mushrooms? Am I not clicking the right thing or....?
     
  8. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    I was thinking that this mushroom looks like something in the Nivei subsection of Coprinus. Coprinus niveus is the classic example, which isn't a far stretch from the example in question --> http://www.grzyby.pl/coprinus-site-Kees-Uljee/species/niveus__.htm
     
  9. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    ahhhh...now that I couldn't find in the first link? but am thinking u could defiantely be correct here! thanx so much!
    C Wick
     
  10. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    It's called Coprinopsis nivea on Michael Kuo's Key. Here is the picture from his page. It superficially resembles the mushrooms in question, but I wouldn't be confident without looking at some spores.

    http://www.rogersmushrooms.com/gallery/DisplayBlock~bid~5858.asp
     
  11. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    can understand.......so often mushrooms have lots of look-alikes....the stem on mine and Michael's finds look thinner? so maybe we should wait till he's able to get a spore? he did say they were 'driable' and didn't 'ink up'...my experience with most that family is that they usually deteriorate quickly even when drying? but i didn't save any of this one...as there were only the two specimins.
     
  12. Mycos

    Mycos Active Member

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    I'm looking at the teeny bits of tissue scattered around on the cap, the darkening of the apex in one with the rapid darkening of the gills seen in another (I agree they're the same species) , all of which combine to leave me somewhere in Coprinus as well.
     

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