Which trees are these?

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Titus, May 29, 2019.

  1. Titus

    Titus New Member

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    I live in south west Alberta. Wondering which trees are these. There are two types here
     

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  2. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Maybe Acer negundo (Manitoba maple) and some type of willow.
     
  3. Titus

    Titus New Member

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    Can I graft a Japanese red maple onto that manitoba maple?
     
  4. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Probably a better question for the maples forum, but I would suspect not. Manitoba maple isn't in the same group as Japanese maples within the various types of maple: Jianhua Li Lab - Projects (scroll down to the bottom and you will see 7 "putative clades" aka 7 groupings of closely-related maples).
     
  5. Titus

    Titus New Member

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    Ya but the Acer ginnala is in the same group as the Acer negundo. Which the ginnala is also red like the Japanese red maple. And that's what I want is those red leaves. So I should be able to graft the ginnala onto the negundo no?
     
  6. Michigander

    Michigander Active Member

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    It doesn't matter how well such a graft takes (or not). Everything will be ruined by the scion growing at a lesser rate than the understock. That's what's wrong with many, many, many grafted trees and shrubs, anyway. Vigorous understock growing at it's typical rate while the scion is trimmed every year. Eventually, the primary growth of the scion is so much out of balance with the rootstock that roots start to overwhelm with a million suckers. Only if the top will almost never be trimmed will the balance between rootsock vigor and top growth be maintained. Of course, if you put a dwarf on "normal" sized rootstock it will be a fool's errand. But there's a saving grace here: The nurseryman who applied his skill to this, and got paid, will be a distant memory when the fool's errand is obtained, years down the road. We've made a lot of progress getting goods to market in the nursery trade...
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Scions overgrowing stocks over time also occurs rather often, so that the trunk ends up being markedly narrower between the scion and the roots.
     
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  8. Michigander

    Michigander Active Member

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    Yes, and I hate that, too.
     
  9. Titus

    Titus New Member

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    Well actually upon further research the ginnala can actually grow in my zone . But let's say I would be interested in grafting, is there a right way of doing it
     

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