which climber to choose from?

Discussion in 'Vines and Climbers' started by jumbojimmy, Dec 29, 2006.

  1. jumbojimmy

    jumbojimmy Active Member

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    i don't know which to choose...out of the three climbers, which would u recommend?

    1) A pink Bougainvilla
    2) A purple wisteria
    3) Jasimin polyanthus

    the pink bougainvilla would look striking and gives off this medititeranian look... and matches the the blue column of my parents balcony...my parents house is cream/whittish . The disadvantage is that it doesn't have any fragrance.

    2) Purple wisteria gives off this classical, and romantic look...the foliage looks nice, but the flowering time is short. It gets leggy/straggly.

    3) As for Jasimin polyanthus...i love the strong fragrant smell...but the foliage and flowers aren't that attractive.


    Btw..is there such thing as a PINK bougainvilla? Is scarlet O'hara "Pinkish" or more "reddish"???

    Secondly do climbers have strong roots that causes damage to the inside? we had this jasmin polyanthus climber-lookalike (can't remember the name...it doesn't have any perfume)...and inside of our house starting to crack...
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Size of space to be occupied? Site conditions (climate, soil, upkeep...)? Characteristics of support system (what plant will grow on)?
     
  3. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Hi Jumbojimmy,

    From the list of vines you have I'm guessing that you have full sun conditions.

    I started researching native Australian vines as the first two you have listed get very large and heavy and can bring down a porch if the structure isn't VERY sturdy. They can also do the foundation damage you mentioned. I found all 3 of your choices on the invasive plants list for Australia, though there is a native wisteria that isn't listed. Wisteria floribunda - Japanese wisteria is listed.
    http://www1.newcastle.nsw.gov.au/services/environment/greening/pdfs/backyardescape.pdf

    Maybe you could consider the native cream colored flowers of Clematis pubescens aka old man's beard which flowers in spring. The second picture is in fruit.
    http://www.warwickhughes.com/flora/clematis_pubescens.jpg
    http://www.walkgps.com/images/Reduc...t_(Old mans beard)__Wungong_reduced_Dec02.JPG

    Coral vine - Kennedia coccinea might be another option and flowers April to November .
    http://www.walkgps.com/images/Reduc...ral Vine_north of Mt Gorrie_reduced_Aug02.JPG

    Native wisteria - Hardenbergia comptoniana flowers July to October.
    http://www.warwickhughes.com/flora/hardenbergia_comptoniana.jpg
    http://www.warwickhughes.com/flora/hardenbergia_comptoniana2.jpg

    There are many other clematis that aren't invasive. You might be able to select two or three that bloom at different times and have the same pruning requirements. Most only grow to 15 feet, but some grow to 30 feet.

    Pink Trumpet Vine or Port St. John Creeper aka Podranea ricasoliana is a native but can also get very large.
    http://www.burkesbackyard.com.au/20...flowering_plants_and_shrubs/pink_trumpet_vine

    Bleeding Heart Vine - Clerodendrum thomsoniae might not be the color you want and is frost tender. It's not native but it's not invasive. You don't say where in Australia you are so I can't tell if it would be a good choice. It has a long bloom time.
    http://www.burkesbackyard.com.au/20...owering_plants_and_shrubs/bleeding_heart_vine

    Bower of Beauty - Pandorea jasminoides comes in pink and blooms year round.
    http://www.anbg.gov.au/images/photo_cd/S1208L5178613/086.html
    http://www.anbg.gov.au/images/photo_cd/51710B6197614/087.html
    http://www.anbg.gov.au/images/photo_cd/732131822162/080.html


    Newt
     
  4. jumbojimmy

    jumbojimmy Active Member

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    Thanks newt and ron....

    I decided to stick to westeria...i love the foliage...and i'd decided to plant some david austin roses and lavander near it to give this cottage feeling.
     
  5. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Jumbojimmy, you are very welcome. I hope your porch is sturdy and you prune off the spent flowers before they go to seed so it doesn't become invasive.

    Newt
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Wisteria above, roses at the middle level and lavender furnishing their bases should be a great scheme if you have the room for the wisteria and can keep them all pruned and trained.
     
  7. TonyR

    TonyR Active Member

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    Wisteria is not usually invasive in Australia except to the extent that it can sucker from the rootstock, especially if you try to get rid of an old plant -- a bit like Campsis in fact. It has no ability to spread far beyond its original planting site; spontaneous seedlings are very uncommon and it has no mechanism for distance dispersal of the seeds.
     
  8. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Consider Wisteria only if you are committed to pruning and training it regularly. Properly trained and pruned, it is a magnificent vine. Left to it's own device, it can turn into an ugly tyrant of a monster.
     

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