When To Plant Windmill Palm Seeds?

Discussion in 'Outdoor Tropicals' started by Evans, Feb 12, 2009.

  1. Evans

    Evans Member

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    Pitt Meadows
    Hi there!

    This is my first post, and my first attempt at growing a palm tree! I just ordered Chinese Windmill Palm seeds (which I was told were the best palm for our area ((Pitt Meadows, BC).

    I was just wondering if anyone had tips on planting? When would be a good time? Any successful hints?

    The seeds come with directions, but any bonus help would be appreciated!

    Thanks!
     
  2. Chungii V

    Chungii V Active Member

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    Hervey Bay Australia zone 10/11
    Seeing as you are going into spring now's a pretty good time. Make sure you have a well protected shady area for the seedlings because that'll be the hardest part if you have extremely cold winters. Palm seedlings are pretty sensitive and they'll need some extra care for the first couple of years until they are big enough.
     
  3. K Baron

    K Baron Well-Known Member

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    You realise that your seeds will take a few years to attain a survivable/transplantable size suitable for transplanting in our climate, and then another 15 years before it will attain a metre in height... you may also consider purchasing a palm from a reputable nursery for $20-30 dollars...that will be about 24 cm. tall....
     
  4. Chungii V

    Chungii V Active Member

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    Good point that....
     
  5. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Evans ... here's my results from local seed. One gallon, two full years and two gallon in five years (knee height potted). These are average growth periods as a small percentage will grow faster, some slower.

    Cheers, LPN.
     

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  6. K Baron

    K Baron Well-Known Member

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    Evans, the climate in Nanaimo/Lantzville is much milder during the winter than Pitt Meadows.
    LPN...did you keep your starter plants in a heated green house? or a cold frame? And hardened them out of doors this past winter? I have 2 Windmill Palms that are 4 years old and they look smaller than your 12 month old beauties! My green thumb, has gone numb!
     
  7. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    LOL! ... these one gallon are two years old, not "12 month old beauties!". Two gallon are five years old. These are in an unheated cold cold frame, a good place to keep the elements off them while they size up, and to keep the deer and rabbits from munching on them.
    I use a slow release 18-6-12 fertilizer during the growing season and nothing else. I always keep the soil fairly well watered. So in all fairness, these would benefit an extra 2 months a year being in the cold frame.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Normally slow, but not painfully so.

    Saw several dripping with fruits in Seattle yesterday, all dark and ripe looking (don't know how cold weather would have affected there condition).

    Too bad you can't eat them.
     
  9. jimhardy

    jimhardy Member

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    Nice pics barrie!
     
  10. palmera

    palmera Active Member

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    Location:
    Chemainus BC Canada
    Back from a winter in the South, I have just finished picking my palm seeds and will be planting asap. (The pictures are of aprox. a thousand or so seeds).
    In the past I have tried scattering them in clear sealed containers (in dampened peat mix) and keeping them in a warm spot in the house and have had sproutings in 3 months. I also have just dumped them in a flat with potting soil and left them outside and had equal success this time of year. I am opting for the 'flat of soil and put them outside' method this year as I can germinate a larger amount this way.
    I think as long as the seed is fresh (and local in my case) just mimick nature and scatter them outside in Feb-March. Easy. In fact, after I am done with the seed flats, the soil ends up in the composter and inevitably I get the left over palm seedlings coming up in my planter boxes!
    As long as you are patient (and somewhat young), the growing of a palm from seed is rewarding. Good luck.
     

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  11. jimhardy

    jimhardy Member

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    I agree that mother(nature) knows best,just watch out for hungry birds and squirrels and the like,good luck-
     

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