When Is Too Late for Planting a Weeping Cherry

Discussion in 'Ornamental Cherries' started by Bobgerard, Sep 13, 2013.

  1. Bobgerard

    Bobgerard New Member

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    Hi,
    I saw some Weeping Cherry trees for sale at our local Lowe's Home Improvement Store. They are about 5 feet tall, and in 7 gallon containers (maybe larger).
    It is now mid-September and we are in Growth Zone 7a (Southern New Jersey)
    I have a great spot for it, where it gets full sun all day long, and I think would be a beautiful addition to the side yard.
    My question- is mid-September too late to plant? Our temperatures are now in the 70's to 80's by day, and 50's -60's by night.
    Thanks for any suggestions!
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Fall is the best time to plant hardy stock - you are certainly not too late.
     
  3. Bobgerard

    Bobgerard New Member

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    Great! Thanks Ron !!
     
  4. Bobgerard

    Bobgerard New Member

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    So, reading up on Weeping Cherry trees, I am a little concerned about their heartyness. Also, we already have two new cherry trees this year (a Bing and a Kanzan), as well as a new Persimmon tree, a new Dwarf Alberta Spruce, two new Emerald Green evergreens and two new Japanese Maples, so am wondering if I should go with an Ornamental Plum tree, which are on sale at the same store. I have seen many Ornamental Plums in our neighborhood, and, in the side yard we want to plant in, it will get full sun all day. It seems that it might provide morning/early afternoon shade to our house as well.
    (One thing I just read that the Ornamental Plums only live about 20 years, so that is a concern, but by then, who know what will be ! )
    So, what would you suggest as the best choice- the Ornamental Plum or the Weeping Cherry?
     
  5. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    One of the biggest complaints about flowering / ornamental plum, is the fruit they drop (anyway). One city here ate the expense after putting them on a required street tree list like back in the 1070s. Often notoriously weak branching.

    Flowering cherry seem to have a far better reputation.

    Like Ron wrote, fine to plant now.

    In fact, as long as a tree gets the needed water, how could it be worse off in the ground than a pot in a nursery. But autumn is optimum planting season.
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Most of these will be hardy in USDA 7. Hardiness and fruiting of purple-leaved plums varies with specific kind. 'Newport', for instance was selected in Minnesota, seldom fruits much, if at all, and produces an attractive mature branching pattern. Comments I have seen repeated elsewhere on the internet about purple-leaved plums being very short-lived etc. pretty much never specify which cultivars are being discussed. In addition to 'Newport' you can find on the current market the large-growing 'Thundercloud' selected in California, the small-growing, heavy-fruiting 'Spencer Hollywood' ('Hollywood' misapplied) recognized and put on the market in Oregon, and the shrubby Prunus x cistena from the Dakotas - as well as others. With all of your stone fruits - including flowering cherries - there can be pest and disease issues that make noticeable inroads, how severe and how likely these are varies with region, planting site and other circumstances.
     
  7. Bobgerard

    Bobgerard New Member

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    Great information- thanks Ron and M.D, Voden. Actually, we discussed the two and the Flowering Plum won out. It is in fact the "Thundercloud" variety prunus cerasifera (also called the Cherry Plum) and makes a nice compliment to the Flowering Cherry on the opposite side of the sunny front yard.
    I have learned that does have several potential issues: "Susceptible to a large number of insect and disease pests. Potential diseases include black knot, leaf spot, die back, leaf curl, powdery mildew, root rot and fire blight. Potential insects include borers, aphids, scale, leafhoppers, caterpillars, tent caterpillars and Japanese beetles" according to one source. Spider mites may also be troublesome. Thus I may very well be back seeing help from you all again! Nonetheless we will hopefully enjoy many years of both trees, and maybe some plums as well.. (i see a new chore for the kids in a few years!)
     

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  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    You are not liable to see more than a scattering and these will be cherry plums, of comparatively small size - and not necessarily of much eating interest.
     

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