when do I start fertilizing in Amarillo

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by tracyballard, Feb 10, 2008.

  1. tracyballard

    tracyballard Member

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    OK, this is our first house we bought last June, and the lawn has some problems, mainly stickers, both sandburr type and goathead (little white flowered plants with small stickers). there are some other common weeds like dandelions and such, but not as prevalent as the stickers. The lawn is mostly bermuda with some fine fescue that outgrows the bermuda in the shade. When do I need to start putting down some stuff to help the bermuda take over and kill out these stickers, and what?? What can I put down that will kill the stickers?? will a weed & feed work good? separate products? lawn is very compacted but I hope not to have to do anything about that. I will also be planting acorns around the yard to try to get some oaks going. Any suggestions? We are on the edge of area 6/7, but it's more like 7 here.
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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  3. tracyballard

    tracyballard Member

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    so, going by that chart, I guess I would need to put down complete fertilizer in April, which would be right after my lawn has pretty much greened up. No pre-emergents needed?
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Lawn herbicides are a possible hazard for applicant, children and pets. I'd rather have some weeds in the lawn than use these, myself. Your plan to reduce weeds by improving conditions for grass growth may get you where you want to be. Probably won't achieve total eradication, but might come close eventually.
     
  5. tracyballard

    tracyballard Member

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    I don't really want to use a lot of herbicides either, but with the neglect that this lawn has had, and the massive patches of goatheads in the main lawn, some 15-20 feet across, and sandburr around the edges, I think I need to give the grass an edge somehow.
     
  6. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    You said "compacted" - so more of a clay type soil than sand?

    Have you considered aerating? Is the lawn fairly free of rocks and stones?
     
  7. Chuck White

    Chuck White Active Member

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    You should find that the sandspurs are individual small plants like wheat stalk, and easy to pull. (Depends on the size of the yard). The other thorn is a "runner" as I recall. It too, can be removed by lifting the runners.
    On occasion, I have found that a 6 inch depth soil renovation with a rototiller works wonders and just takes a weekend, usually. 1.) Rototill. 2.) Lay down 4 to 6 inches of sphagnum peat moss. 3.) Rototill once more. (for special help to the lawn, spread 10-10-10 fertilizer over the peat before you 'till it in.). 4.) In a wheelbarrow, mix the grass seed appropriate to your area and a 60 pound bag of the fertilizer{this will be additional fert.}. 5.) Spread this on the lawn with the axiom in mind that some is for the birds, some is to blow away, some is to be buried to deeply, etc. With a tree branch that has many small branches, drag the surface of the new lawn smooth. 6.) From the local feed store, procure bails of hay. Use the ratio of 1 bale per 200 sq. feet and cover your seeded area to a depth of 2-3 inches with the hay.
    All of the above accomplished, water the heck out of it with a fine spray nozzle. Really wet the soil.
    As your instinct is already telling you, seeds from the hay, the sandspurs, and the goatheads all will have leaves different than the grass. As these undesirables start to germinate, they can be visually spotted and plucked out, easily.
    Keep it watered to keep it germinating. After a couple of weeks, you should have a pretty impressive new lawn.
     

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