What plant is this

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by helenristovski, Apr 23, 2010.

  1. helenristovski

    helenristovski Member

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    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Can anyone tell me the name of this plant?
    Thanks!
     

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  2. Makealza

    Makealza Member

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    Hi they are lovely and their name is woodland bluebells.
     
  3. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

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  4. Barbara Lloyd

    Barbara Lloyd Well-Known Member

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    Technically they are Hyacinthoides, wood hyacinth. or blue bell. There are several varieties and come in white, pink and blue and naturalize beautifully. A smaller type but same basic family are the little grape hyacinth that also naturalize well. I have seen fields of these blooming in the spring - beautiful! barb
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Many in cultivation are hybrids rather than pure forms of one species.
     
  6. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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  7. Barbara Lloyd

    Barbara Lloyd Well-Known Member

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    Yes Ron & Michael, there are several, many cousins. One of the ladies at the Senior centre where we hold our Master Gardener Plant Clinic, asked about what she thought was a Snow Drop which she was familiar with coming from Scotland - but to tall. I brought out the Sunset Garden book and showed her the pic and disc. of the GALANTHUS. Not-quite-right, but right next to it was the pic. & description for GALTONIA, candicans, Summer Hyacinth. Much taller and spot on for what she'd seen. She was confused because it was native to South Africa, why was it here? I asked her if she was familiar with Scotch Broom, and where did it come from - Scotland. Some home sick Scotsman brought it with him and now it's all over the place. People have been moving their favourite plants with them for many years. I like being able to solve the little questions. I'll leave the big ones to you guys. barb ;))
     
  8. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

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  9. johnnyjumpup

    johnnyjumpup Active Member

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    This is so interesting. Thanks for the link to photos of all three spiecies. For many years I had only the pretty Spanish bluebells then I found some English bluebells offered for sale for the first time and, naturally, had to try them as well.

    I planted both kinds in my garden (did not know about the third until reading this thread), the Spanish in the front and the English in the back so I could keep them separate and compare them. I noticed the English bluebell bulbs looked like little potatoes and the Spanish have the silvery skin like an onion. A good way to distinguish between them, I thought.

    The English ones came up, possibly didn't care for the place, and subsequently disappeared. Certainly did not go forth and reseed madly about which I defiinitely was hoping for. That was several years ago and I haven't seen them offered since.

    Last fall I bought a pkg of Spanish Bluebells and upon opening the bag found the bulbs looked like little potatoes. I am now waiting for them to bloom. Thanks to the link, I see English bluebells have a much more closed bell with tightly curled back rims. Which will it be? The suspense mounts.
     

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