What kind of thorny menace is this?!

Discussion in 'Vines and Climbers' started by Koehle, Jul 17, 2006.

  1. Koehle

    Koehle Member

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    I found this growing vigorously in my parents' backyard. The first time we found it, we dug down to a huge root ball that looked more like a deformed radish, (we had to pull the dogs off of it, they were chewing it up as fast as they could), the original vine was brown and woody. A week or so later another stalk came up out of the root system that we missed and at about 3 feet looked just like a giant asparagus sprig. Dug that root up, and in about 3 weeks a new stalk has shown up. It's about 10 or so feet right now. Anyone have any idea? (The dogs are fine by the way)
     

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  2. smivies

    smivies Active Member

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    You want to know what the throny stemed plant is and not trying to Identify the English Ivy or Bamboo that I see in the photos?

    I'm not good with 'subtropical' plants but a vine with thorns could be:
    - species of Smilax (greenbriar)
    - climbing rose
    - American bittersweet
    - bouganvellia

    Simon
     
  3. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Agreed - a photo of the leaves / foliage would be more helpful than a photo of the woody stem.
     
  4. Koehle

    Koehle Member

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    Yes, the vine is what I am trying to id. It's crazy. I have been trying to find a good picture of species of smilax, so far no luck. Thanks for the ideas though, I am going to keep looking.
     
  5. Koehle

    Koehle Member

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    So far the only thing growing off of this vine is a couple tendrils and the little flap at the bottom in the first pic is the original bud that it pops out of, I will try to get a photo of the top and the root ball this weekend, thanks for your time.
     
  6. Koehle

    Koehle Member

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    The return of thorny menace II!

    Ok,

    I took more pictures of the mystery vine after I dug it up. It is approx 12 feet tall, the first pic is one of the tendril areas, the next is the top of the plant, the third is a pic of about the first 5ft of the plant from the base, the newer growth is smooth, the last pic is a cross section of the smoother part of the vine and the gooey aloe type slime in the middle. The last photo is the part of the root I pulled up, however the first time we dug up the original plant the root was much larger, about the size of a small cantelope. I looked up some of the plants suggested, of all the guesses smilax might be the one but I can't locate any pictures to compare it to. Any suggestions? This has really gotten me curious.
     

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  7. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    (merged threads)
     
  8. smivies

    smivies Active Member

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    Yes, definitely Smilax, but which one???

    Here is a photo of Smilax hispida, one of the fourteen species of Smilax found in South Carolina. USDA Search - Smilax, South Carolina
     

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  9. Koehle

    Koehle Member

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    Thanks Smivies, I'm going to look through the link you passed on. I just wanted to put a name to it, I have never seen anything this size before. Again, thanks for the help.
     
  10. C.Dragonworks

    C.Dragonworks Active Member

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    Here in S TX we call the tye vines... seems the Native Indians here used them to make baskets and to tye up bundles of fire wood... I do know our horses and goats relish the leaves of this and birds love the berries.... Cat
     

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