What is this?

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Grapevine, Jan 31, 2010.

  1. Grapevine

    Grapevine Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Oporto
    Hello there,

    I was wondering what kind of plant or vine is this? What is it called?
    Can you help me?

    Thanks in Advance.
     

    Attached Files:

    • vine.jpg
      vine.jpg
      File size:
      29.6 KB
      Views:
      154
  2. togata57

    togata57 Generous Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    3,301
    Likes Received:
    267
    Location:
    Columbus, Ohio
    Looks like an Epiphyllum.
     
  3. kevind76

    kevind76 Active Member

    Messages:
    409
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Winnipeg, Canada
    I agree. Does it only bloom at night? I would say Epiphyllum oxypetalum - Queen-of-the-night cactus. Is it a very tall, spindly pant, with large, flat, cactus pads?
     
  4. thanrose

    thanrose Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    800
    Likes Received:
    55
    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL USA USDA Zone 9
    It's not Epiphyllum oxypetalum, because of the visible tufts of glochids. Also the flower is not quite right. I'd venture it's a Cereus, but I don't know.
     
  5. kevind76

    kevind76 Active Member

    Messages:
    409
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Winnipeg, Canada
    What's a glochid?
     
  6. togata57

    togata57 Generous Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    3,301
    Likes Received:
    267
    Location:
    Columbus, Ohio
    Somewhere in Finian's Rainbow.. But, seriously...
    ...think that thanrose is referring to the pointy bits sticking out behind and around the flower.

    Hmm. I had thought that glochids were found only on members of the Opuntioideae...y'know, those virulently adhesive and nearly invisible spines that find their way into your fingers no matter HOW careful you are.

    Clearly, we need some input from 1. thanrose; 2. the omniscient Ron B.
    I shall await their sage words o'wisdom.

    How are things of glochid for ya....? (With apologies to E.Y. Harburg.)
     
  7. sundew kook

    sundew kook Active Member

    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Turin, Italy
    Selenicereus grandiflorus ?
     
  8. thanrose

    thanrose Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    800
    Likes Received:
    55
    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL USA USDA Zone 9
    Glochids are the tiny hair like cactus bits that you find everywhere, sticking out of your fingers and forearms. You usually need tweezers or tape to remove the little irritants. That cactus leaf in the foreground of the picture has tufts of white on it that are made up of glochids. On opuntia, those little mounds would probably have a few serious spines, too.

    Epiphyllum oxypetalum doesn't have spines or glochids, at least not like that leaf.

    Selenicereus spp is more like the flower in question, but I don't have any experience with them. I do have Epiphyllum oxypetalum, now splotched with dead areas because of the cold weather we've had here.
     
  9. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,883
    Likes Received:
    625
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Yes, the one shoot visible indicates it might be a Selenicereus. There are many kinds of night-blooming cacti.
     
  10. SusanDunlap

    SusanDunlap Active Member

    Messages:
    705
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    California, United States
    think togata57 is right - that glochids are confined to Opuntioideae. They are burrs: unlike spines, they have a "hook" on the tip that enable them to embed into fur, skin, etc. And they sting human's once embedded. Easy enough to find out if there are glochids on this plant - touch the areole and see if some tiny thing sticks to your flesh and stings you at the same time....
     

Share This Page