What is this? Invasive honeysuckle?

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Jacqueline, Jun 1, 2020.

  1. Jacqueline

    Jacqueline New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southeast Michigan
    Hello,
    I’m new here, and did a brief search for what this plant may be. Can anyone identify? I’ve thought maybe an invasive honeysuckle? Missed the initial bloom, so I’m not sure if it was scented or pure color. I want to remove, but happy to replant if native to SE Michigan. Thanks! The dark leaf pic was in the shade; leaves are light green.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society

    Messages:
    5,398
    Likes Received:
    3,296
    Location:
    Hampshire England Zone 8b UK
    Hi Jacqueline, this photo was taken this morning along a river bank. Very invasive but smelt lovely. Hope you can compare. Your leaves are a bit lighter.
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,178
    Likes Received:
    319
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    First kind is a free standing shrub, second a climber. While there are shrubby honeysuckles of foreign origin that are nuisance plants in eastern North America there are also native species present within the region. And I am not recognizing the plant shown as being one of the familiar weedy ones. So perhaps it is actually native there in MI.
     
  4. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    3,398
    Likes Received:
    140
    Location:
    Vancouver
    Kind of has the look of Diervilla lonicera, which is native to Michigan.
     
  5. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society

    Messages:
    5,398
    Likes Received:
    3,296
    Location:
    Hampshire England Zone 8b UK
    This is another photo of a Honeysuckle growing wild further along the river bank this morning. The leaves on this one 'appear' to be Lonicera Japonica !!??
    Just another thought for you to compare.
    @Eric La Fountaine is more than likely nearer the ball though.

    D
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Margot

    Margot Contributor

    Messages:
    1,102
    Likes Received:
    371
    Location:
    Nanoose Bay, BC Canada
    Here in BC, we have 2 climbing honeysuckles, Lonicera ciliosa and L. hispidula, neither of which are fragrant. Because they are native and I love native plants, I have let them be on my property. All of a sudden (it seems) L. hispidula has really taken off and is extending multiple 8-foot-long vines this spring and thereby creating a serious tripping hazard wherever I go. So I'm pulling it out by the armful but, oh, what a job especially on rocky hillsides.

    A few years ago, I took a picture of L. hispidula engulfing the canopy of a Garry Oak tree, which I thought was very beautiful. That species is less likely to climb than the orange L. ciliosa (which looks fabulous climbing in the equally rampant pink Rosa nootkatensis). A couple of years ago both the honeysuckle and the oak died - not sure why.

    Here are some photos from a few years ago - not on my propery - showing the strength of honeysuckle - probably L. ciliosa.
     

    Attached Files:

    wcutler and Acerholic like this.
  7. Acerholic

    Acerholic Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society

    Messages:
    5,398
    Likes Received:
    3,296
    Location:
    Hampshire England Zone 8b UK
    Hi @Margot , amazing photos. Nature can be very aggressive and competitive when looked at closely. Survival of the fittest!!!
    I so agree with you, 'native plants every time'. Let's look at them when on holiday or online etc, but leave them where they belong.

    D
     
  8. Margot

    Margot Contributor

    Messages:
    1,102
    Likes Received:
    371
    Location:
    Nanoose Bay, BC Canada
    Luckily, there are dozens and dozens of BC native plants that are 'garden worthy'.

    Over the years, I have added to the ones already growing here and now have a large number of native shrubs, perennials (including ferns and bulbs), and annuals.
     

Share This Page