What is this fruit ?

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Brianzero, Aug 9, 2010.

  1. Brianzero

    Brianzero Member

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    Hello
    I just found this site while searching for info regarding a tree in my garden.
    Thought to be 'Blackthorn' Will try to describe
    About 4m tall
    Long slender branches
    Small white flowers before leaves
    Oval leaves [about 5cm[ serrated edges
    Spines/spikes about 3 / 5cm long
    Currently has a plum / cherry like with soft fleshy fruit size about 2cm with small stone. [On lower third of tree]

    I am seeking answers to the following
    What is likely name
    What is fruit
    Is it edible

    Regards
    Brianzero
     
  2. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Welcome Brianzero.
    Prunus spinosa, common name Blackthorn does have large thorns.
    However, the fruits known as sloes in Brtitain, are black, very small and hard, bitter and horrid to eat. Not normally picked till after the first frost and used to make Sloe gin.

    Blackthorn is not normally a tree, but is found as a straggy hedge row shrub. See pic 5 in 1st link for the thorns.

    http://www.plant-identification.co.uk/skye/rosaceae/prunus-spinosa.htm

    http://www.sloe.biz/sloes/index.htm

    http://www.google.co.uk/images?um=1...sloes&btnG=Search&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=


    A pic would really help. What colour are the fruits?

    Prunus domestica. The wild plum tree does have thorns.

    http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/...-trees/tree-factsheets/p-to-r/plum/index.html
     
  3. Brianzero

    Brianzero Member

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    Hi Silver Surfer

    Thanks for response

    Just taken pics [Not sure how this site works as yet]
    The pics seem to be in a box below this one
    Hope this OK

    Yellow fruit
    A few have fallen
    A few are rotting in situ

    Just seen post - seems to work


    Brianzero
     

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  4. Tyrlych

    Tyrlych Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Looks like Cherry plum.
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Yep: Prunus cerasifera. As mentioned, blackthorn is quite different, kind of like a deciduous version of a firethorn (Pyracantha) in aspect. With different fruits, of course.
     
  6. Fen Sandar

    Fen Sandar Active Member

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    They look safe to eat and probably quite tasty.
     
  7. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I hesitate to push the thread off-topic, and know what you meant by your statement Fen (especially after learning what the plant is), but I do feel obliged to say that stating something looks safe to eat should be preceded by researching and confirming edibility.
     
  8. Brianzero

    Brianzero Member

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    Hi all replies - thanks...
    Safe to eat ? Make wine ?
    That was my next question !
    Not sure how edibility research is done !
    Except by 'looking on' while someone else takes the risk
    If birds take a bite - would they be OK ?

    Regards
     
  9. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Prunus cerasifera. Common name Cherry plum.

    http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?imgu...&ndsp=24&ved=1t:429,r:16,s:0&biw=1243&bih=528

    Yes, edible!

    Quote from wiki...." Some varieties have sweet fruits that can be eaten fresh, while others are sour and better for making jam."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cherry_plum

    On British forums this has cropped up several times this year. There seems to be a bumper crop this year. People are wondering what it is, and have never even noticed the cherry plum fruits before.

    There is also a puple leaf form. Prunus cerasifera nigra, with red fruit.

    http://www.google.co.uk/images?hl=e...=UTF-8&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&biw=1243&bih=528

    http://www.gardenworldimages.com/De...censes=1,2&sort=REL&cdonly=False&mronly=False
     
  10. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    The Plants for a Future database is typically a good place to start with such research.

    Here is the entry for Prunus cerasifera

    In answer to the question re: birds -- no. What birds can or cannot eat is different than humans (and cats, dogs, sheep, cows). "Looking on" while someone else (human) takes a bite is actually quite a good policy!
     
  11. Brianzero

    Brianzero Member

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    Hi Daniel
    You say
    'Prunus cerasifera'
    I read
    Edibilty rating of 4 [out of ?]
    With just a touch of cyanide !!

    Any volunteers ?

    Thanks everybody - think I have got all I need for now

    Regards
    Brian
     
  12. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Edibility. The key show..... 4 green apples= really useful plant!
     
  13. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    The cyanide is in the stone, which you don't eat ;-)

    I've eaten plenty of Cherry Plum fruit over the years, and am still around . . .
     

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