Identification: What is it?

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by tlfouhar, Apr 9, 2006.

  1. tlfouhar

    tlfouhar Member

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    I found this shelf mushroom on a dead log. Some were flat and others were stacked-like on top of each other. They were tan with concentric rings and a brown velvety spot on the top. They were large 5cm-12cm. My guess was an Inonotus species, but just not sure. Any help in identifying this would be greatly appreciated.
     

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  2. allelopath

    allelopath Active Member 10 Years

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    Do you know the species of the tree/log?
     
  3. tlfouhar

    tlfouhar Member

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    The log was deteriorated, but it had fairly smooth bark. There are lots of beech trees and conifers in the area. I forgot the cardinal rule...noting the substrate! At first I thought it was a Phaeolus schweinitzii, but the color seems all wrong and it keyed out to Inonotus tomentous in Mushrooms Demystified by David Arora. I do think it over-wintered rather then being a fresh fungus. It didn't stain when handled and it is rather corky.
     
  4. Mycos

    Mycos Active Member

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    It is rather odd isn't it? I know that we usually associate Laetiporus sulphureus with the bright yellows and oranges, but the zones/rings and fleshy appearence brought it to mind. If we think of it as one that got started in a poor location for growing the more typical shelves due to it's poor choice in orientation (hey, it happens! <g>) AND unusual colors as well, then just maybe.....

    Here's a couple of pics I ran into looking for variations and they are reminiscent.

    http://www.pilzepilze.de/piga/zeige.htm?name=mehr&pilz=laetiporus_sulphureus&nr=0

    http://www.mykoweb.com/CAF/photos/Laetiporus_sulphureus(fs).jpg

    This may very well be wrong, but i can't think of anything that resembles your pic, and due that pinky-flesh color and strong zones or color bands, I'm sure I'd remember seeing even a picture of something like this /IF/ this were its usual appearance.
     
  5. tlfouhar

    tlfouhar Member

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    Thanks Mycos for the suggestion. It doesn't seem to fit the Laetiporus family. I will have to take it to the next MMA meeting and hopefully someone can ID it there.
     
  6. tlfouhar

    tlfouhar Member

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    After two years I finally found my way back to this site... after a computer crash and loosing my "favorites" list. I sent this fungus to Ed Bosman, who was a mycologist with COMA. He has recently passed away. Ed identified this fungus as a Fomes fomentarius. He said the reason it looks "funny" is because the fungus was on a downed tree (birch) on a hiking trail, and it was being moved around so the fungus was reorienting itself so the pores would be down.
     
  7. Mycos

    Mycos Active Member

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    Ahhh! Given the flat, crustose-like growth pattern, that never would have occurred to me. But if the log has been getting rolled around fairly regularly, I guess it does makes some sense. Heh! How odd... Almost has a certain artistic appeal, an aesthetic of the sort that someone with the patience to cultivate Bonsai trees might appreciate. :-)
     
  8. fish dr

    fish dr Active Member

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    So that's what it is. It made a delicious tea (I think). Well, it didn't kill me. LOL

    You can make felt hats and fabrics from the fluff you get when you pound it. (Or start a campfire.)
     
  9. tlfouhar

    tlfouhar Member

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    I found a downed birch tree growing several nice little F. fomentarius so I decided to make it an experiment and see if I can make it "reorient" itself. I rolled the long over and I am going to keep a weekly check on it and see what happens to it.
     
  10. Mycos

    Mycos Active Member

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    Great! Let us know what happens, okay?
     
  11. tlfouhar

    tlfouhar Member

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    Yes, I will.
     

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