Identification: What are These Plants

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by CdnPlantCrazy, Oct 21, 2010.

  1. CdnPlantCrazy

    CdnPlantCrazy Member

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    One plant is a tropical plant I recently obtained. No name on it. Could it be of the calathea family?

    The other white plant is outside in my garden. Very lovely large white thistle looking leaves. I did not plant this. What is it?
     

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  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    The whiteness on the second plant may be mildew rather than a characteristic of the plant. The plant is perhaps a thistle.
     
  3. CdnPlantCrazy

    CdnPlantCrazy Member

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    Thank you for your reply. Yes it does resemble a thistle but the whitish leaves were when it started growing and stayed this marvelous white colour. We had a dry summer so mildew was ruled out.

    I willl just let it keep growing until it does whatever it will do. It is a very attractive plant.

    Krista
     
  4. Lysichiton

    Lysichiton Active Member

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    Second one. Possibly a small Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus). They do occasionally come from seed in my garden in Langley.

    gb
     
  5. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Second one looks to me like a young Cotton Thistle Onopordum acanthium.
     
  6. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Nobody's going to bite on that first one? It looks like a fancy Spathyphyllum or Agalodorum or similar (hence, an Aroid) to me. I'll ask Exotic Rainforest - if anyone will recognize it, it's him.
     
  7. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    The first is Alocasia lauterbachiana from Papua New Guinea. Extremely tropical.
     
  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Mildew is associated with dry summer conditions, that is why it is prevalent on the Pacific Slope of North America. Droughtiness + fog and dew = excellent environment for mildew.
     
  9. CdnPlantCrazy

    CdnPlantCrazy Member

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    Thank you for your reply. Yes, it is Alocasia lauterbachiana. Perfect. Now I can really make sure it gets the proper care. (I was already doing it right but it is so nice to make sure).
     
  10. Debby

    Debby Active Member 10 Years

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    Yes, I think the second one is Onopordum acanthium, deemed a noxious weed. But it is a handsome plant that can be allowed to flower so long as the gardener prevents the seeds from maturing/cuts off the top/removes the plant.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2010
  11. CdnPlantCrazy

    CdnPlantCrazy Member

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    Yes, I am thinking it is a Scotch Thistle. If it is the one I am thinkig of, a neighbour in this area had a couple growing in her front yard as individual plants. It was about 2 metres high and an unusual greyish look. Very slender, spikey look. Nice "architectural" look in front of her house. She did not know what it was called. I will know better next spring/summer as it grows up more.

    Thank you for your help.
     
  12. CdnPlantCrazy

    CdnPlantCrazy Member

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    Scotch Thistle a noxious weed? I read it was invasive. How is it noxious?
     
  13. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Correct name for Onopordum acanthium is Cotton Thistle. 'Sc*tch' (with the exception of whisky) is offensive to people in Scotland and should not be used ('Sc*tch' is to Scots, as 'ni*ger' is to African).

    Please edit your posts to correct.
     
  14. CdnPlantCrazy

    CdnPlantCrazy Member

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    Thank you. I will amend my information about this plant to reflect this change.
     
  15. Lysichiton

    Lysichiton Active Member

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    Uh, Oh, Ron. You better contact e Flora BC. This is their nomenclature:

    Onopordum acanthium L subsp. acanthium Scotch cottonthistle; Scotch thistle

    :)

    gb.
     
  16. Debby

    Debby Active Member 10 Years

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    It wasn't Ron; it was Michael F. who cited his/all Scots' objection.
     
  17. Lysichiton

    Lysichiton Active Member

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    Well, I don't mind. I am an equal-opportunity nitpicker!

    Seriously - Sorry Ron. I apologize, which I have had to do to you before, I think.

    gb.
     
  18. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Ignorance of the offensiveness of various ethnic slurs outside of the often fairly local area of significance, is a major problem. In the past it didn't matter so much, as the usage didn't reach the people affected: BC publications were only read in BC, not in Scotland, so no-one would be aware of the problem. But with today's highly globalised communications, the matter becomes more serious, and needs to be tackled.
     

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