What’s happening with my dancing peacock?

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Castor, Aug 30, 2018.

  1. Castor

    Castor New Member

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    The leaf will not do anything else,it’s been like this for a month now.
     

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  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    That's a tough one to Google. Can't use "arrested development" to find anything...

    Is this maple potbound?
     
  3. JT1

    JT1 Rising Contributor

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    Your tree says:
    … "I'm never gonna dance again
    Guilty feet have got no rhythm
    Though it's easy to pretend
    I know you're not a fool"…
    George Michael (now stuck in my head)

    They do this sometimes when they start to grow then it gets too hot and or dry. The thin black twig can be removed back flush to the stem.

    Are they always on the concrete? If so they maybe getting too hot and dry. How often do you water? Is the soil free draining pine bark based?

    I suspect it's getting too hot, the concrete would not help, and they may need more water (frequency and duration). Pot bound can contribute as already mentioned.

    Maybe it left it's dancing shoes at the nursery...or lost its rhythm due to heat.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2018
  4. Castor

    Castor New Member

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    No it’s not pot bound,just purchased this tree this year.I water it every two days.The soil is free draining pine bark based. I will move it from the concrete and see if that helps. Thanks
     
  5. JT1

    JT1 Rising Contributor

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    While we are still in the heat of August into September, you may need to water daily. It helps cool the roots too during the hottest part of the Summer. Any rain is a bonus, but should not be counted on because the leaves cause water to drip outside the pot in most cases. Adding pine needles to the surface or some additional pine bark can help with moisture loss and help keep surface roots cool.
     
  6. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I don't know how it works with maples, but I know plants are often sold ready/needing to be repotted. Might be worth just checking?
     
  7. AlainK

    AlainK Well-Known Member Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    I think that's the problem.

    I lost (?) a couple of trees because of lack of watering for just one day. Tonight, I noticed that the "Kotp-no-Ito" is pushing new leaves on two branches, the same with 'Tsuma Gaki' - two of my favourites ^^

    All my maples (and other species, including deciduous bonsai) but two or three are in containers.

    Those that were repotted in late winter/early spring fare well. The others suffer. Probably too many roots in the pot, less oxygen, less water or moisture to keep them healthy. The ones in new soil mix, including some that are in 1.5 cm-deep pots (half-an-inch) are OK.

    I've "slip-potted" some into a larger pot with free-draining mix, and they're recovering, slowly, but they're recovering.
     
  8. Castor

    Castor New Member

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    I’m not sure if it’s a lack of watering,I keep the soil moist. I’m gonna try watering it daily I live in the southeast zone 7b hot and humid, so i’ll See if that works to. I have other buds breaking, i’m guessing it’s the second growth spurts.
     
  9. 0soyoung

    0soyoung Member

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    Regardless of species-variety, trees do poorly with root temperatures above 95F/35C. Stick an ordinary meat thermometer probe in the soil and make sure the root temperatures are okay. If not, do whatever it takes to make it be that way (e.g., water, shade the pot, move the works somewhere else, etc.). If you find root temperatures are always safe, then you can cross root temperature off the list of possible causes of the problem.
     

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