Identification: Weird white feathery goop, appeared overnight on dead and hurt wood.

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by Gabriolan, Jan 19, 2009.

  1. Gabriolan

    Gabriolan Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Gabriola Island, BC, Canada
    I've never been so puzzled.

    One day I walked a certain trail, and none of this stuff was around. Next day, same location: hundreds of patches seen in a thirty-minute walk. What on earth is it? This white feathery growth appears on fallen branches and injured parts of alder trees.

    There are a few more photos this page of my blog.

    I'm in zone 8 or zone 9a, or something like that. (Gabriola Island, on the sw coast of Canada.)

    Any ideas?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. woodschmoe

    woodschmoe Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    697
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    gulf island, bc, canada
    It's ice; usually referred to as 'frost flowers'. Do a google search on the term, or check out the wikipedia entry for more information. Interesting phenomenon.
     
  3. Gabriolan

    Gabriolan Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Gabriola Island, BC, Canada
    Thank you, woodschmoe, thank you! I'm delighted that you've solved this mystery for me. I would never have found the answer if I'd just stuck to my native plant books!

    I've been to the Wikipedia page on frost flowers, an am fascinated with the topic. Frost flowers give me another thing to be happy about on winter morning hikes.
     
  4. wild-rose-43

    wild-rose-43 Active Member

    Messages:
    289
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    I have lived in the Northwestern mountains all my life and have never seen this. It's so cool!!!
     
  5. Gabriolan

    Gabriolan Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Gabriola Island, BC, Canada
    wild-rose-43, try going for early morning walks when it's cold and frosty, and you'd rather be at home with a cup of coffee. Bundle up in your warmies, take your camera, and set off to explore obscure woodland areas. Repeat regularly throughout the winter. And maybe, just maybe....
     
  6. wildebeast

    wildebeast Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Castle Rock,Washington USA
    Gabriolan, I've seen this for years and never knew what it was and thanks for your question I found out rather quickly. I went to check my cameras today and found more, so I placed it in my hand ( I'm careful around fungi ) and it was amazing, cold and frost like but melted very slow.

    Think I might setup a camera in time lapse to watch it grow, but think it grows at night. Gives me something to look forward to though.

    cliff
     
  7. Gabriolan

    Gabriolan Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Gabriola Island, BC, Canada
    wildebeast, time lapse photography of this stuff growing would be amazing! I'd love to see that. Will you let us peek if you get a good series of shots?
     
  8. wildebeast

    wildebeast Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Castle Rock,Washington USA
    I certainly would show the photos, and think I can setup one of my cameras for time lapse, but will check to make sure. Think if I soak a limb in the river, then set it on the bank just before the weather turns cold it might work. I like to stay busy so this gives me a chance to learn more about nature. Our climate in the pacific northwest is great for this project.

    cliff
     

Share This Page